Fujitsu gets a jump on the competition

Fujitsu gets a jump on the competition

Summary: With years of experience meeting the regulatory demands of Japan, Fujitsu is ready to take on the rest of the world.

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TOPICS: Cloud
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To many in corporate IT, Fujitsu is an “Oh yea” type company. The one that gets added to the bottom of the list when IT begins to consider vendors for new technologies and the staff is sitting around brainstorming for new ideas that can be converted to business advantages.  Of course, this isn’t the case in Japan, where Fujitsu gets better than two-thirds of their annual revenue and is at the top of IT’s list for many products and technologies.

It’s not that Fujitsu isn’t a major player, as this week’s Fujitsu Forum, Europe’s largest single vendor technical event demonstrates. It’s just more of a hearts and mind issue outside of Fujitsu’s home turf. But one announcement at the Forum really highlights what Fujitsu will be capable of on the world stage; the Fujitsu Eco Track. Eco track is a cloud based tool designed to allow companies to perform comprehensive energy audits of their IT operations. On the surface, that doesn’t sound exciting, but new EU regulations require companies above a certain size to perform these audits,  and business will be scrambling for cost effective tools to handle the new regulation’s requirements.

This is where Fujitsu’s home turf comes into play. In many ways, Fujitsu gets an entire country to be the testbed for its products and technologies. The insular nature of Japan means that home grown business are the ones that are first up to deal with Japan’s own internal regulation and  the rapid adoption of new technologies means that there is rarely as shortage of customers willing to try technologies to get a business advantage over their peers.

These energy audits are an excellent case in point; while vendors in the rest of the world are in the early stages of developing tools and technologies to allow their customers to meet this requirement, Fujitsu has over a decade of experience with it, having had to deal with the auditing requirements at home since the beginning of this century. This means that their new product is backed by a significant amount of experience in dealing not just with internal development but with experience with software solutions in the wild which would be hard for any of their competitors to match.

With the use of an entire country as a technology incubator, Fujitsu’s efforts to move to greater prominence on the world stage are likely to be very successful.

Topic: Cloud

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  • Japan buys local when they can

    It does not make Fujitsu a good company. The last equipment I saw from them was cheap in all senses of the word. I am in no hurry to look at their gear. Plenty of good vendors already.
    happyharry_z