Get ready for Windows Server 2012 and Powershell 4.0

Get ready for Windows Server 2012 and Powershell 4.0

Summary: Have you made any advancements toward moving to Windows Server 2012 and Powershell 4.0? If not, I have a shortcut for you: CBT Nuggets classes taught by Don Jones.

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I interviewed CBT Nuggets' distinguished teacher and lecturer Don Jones a few days ago about Windows Server 2012, Powershell 4.0, and what to expect for system administrators on those platforms. Don is a seasoned and highly acclaimed Windows administrator, author, writer, and teacher*. He's been in the technology sector for more than 20 years and has taught Powershell versions 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 to thousands of students from all over the world.

Don is also CEO, board member, and major contributor to Powershell.org, where you'll find tutorials, podcasts, and articles written by him and his associates.

In the podcast, we discuss the new features of Powershell 4.0, including what you can expect from it, some of its limitations, and the future of Powershell as an administrative and automation language. We also discuss some very important points concerning the future of Windows administration and how you, the administrator, and Powershell will interface to create a new breed of automation-enabled management.

He has some pointed things to say to you, as administrators, about learning Powershell and how that in two to three revisions, you'll be able to perform every administrative task via Powershell. 

Read this

Windows Server 2012 R2: Screenshots

Windows Server 2012 R2: Screenshots

The 'Blue' upgrade to Windows Server 2012, R2, looks much like its predecessor, but there are plenty of changes when you look at the fine detail.

I think the primary message that you can takeaway from this podcast is, "You should learn Powershell now". That's very good advice from someone who's seen Windows, Powershell, Batch/CMD files, and VBScript evolve over time.

And it isn't simply because he's teaching the courses. It's because he knows what he's talking about. Almost every major vendor has developed Powershell cmdlets for managing their hardware from Windows. VMware has Powershell cmdlets. HP has Powershell for managing blade enclosures. Cisco has a Powershell Toolkit. And that's only three that I can recall off the top of my head.

Whether or not you like Powershell, it's here to stay. And if you're going to stay in the IT business as a system administrator, you need to learn it. Remember that using automation scripting is the mark of a smart administrator and a more valuable employee. And as Don tells you succinctly in the podcast, "You're learning this for yourself and for your carreer".

Podcast Info: 33:16 minutes. MP3 format. Rating: G for all audiences.

Don Jones on Windows Server 2012 and Powershell 4.0.

*Don Jones and I are practically the same guy except that he has a grand talent for Powershell. I, on the other hand, have to struggle with it. Oh, and he doesn't make people as mad as I seem to.

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Topics: Windows Server, Enterprise Software

About

Kenneth 'Ken' Hess is a full-time Windows and Linux system administrator with 20 years of experience with Mac, Linux, UNIX, and Windows systems in large multi-data center environments.

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  • WMIC

    I also feel the need to highlight batch file scripting using WMIC. It is one of the most un-heard of tools for hooking into WMI interface and gathering/manipulating data for both local & remote nodes. I use it for everything from uninstalling Symantec EP to software distribution (Office deployments, Adobe updates etc).
    Create Audit reports to a html htable format for easy reading, like i said. Not many people even realize the power of it.
    JohnnyJammer