Google Apps ups Quickoffice integration, eyes Windows 8 on tablets

Google Apps ups Quickoffice integration, eyes Windows 8 on tablets

Summary: Google Apps makes an anti-Microsoft Office play as it continues to integrate Quickoffice into the fold.

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The Google enterprise team has published an update about how it is integrating Quickoffice and its office productivity solutions into Google Apps for business customers.

The primary focus of the update is to inform Google Apps customers about how to convert old Microsoft Office files to Google documents and then edit them directly in Quickoffice.

Jonathan Rochelle, director of product management for Google Drive, asserted in a blog post on Wednesday that the team has "incorporated Quickoffice conversion technology into this process so your Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint files look even better when you convert them to Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, respectively."

The key words there are "look even better" on Google Apps products. Essentially, this is a play to compete with Windows 8 on tablets.

To recall, Google acquired Quickoffice in June -- months ahead of the release of Windows 8.

But now that Windows 8, the Surface and other new Win 8 devices are out on the market, it's time to turn the competition up a notch. Thus, Google is pulling out more stops to demonstrate support for as many apps and platforms as possible to please as many business customers as possible.

To nudge this strategy along, Google is making Quickoffice available on the iPad for free -- at least for Apps customers. With this app, Rochelle promised that Apps users could open and edit any Office files stored in Google Drive right from an iPad.

But smartphones won't be neglected for long. Android and iPhone versions are promised to follow soon.

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Images via The Google Enterprise Blog

Topics: Google, Apps, Microsoft, Tablets, Google Apps

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34 comments
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  • Google apps and products are a joke...

    Google's Eric Schmidt said recently that his company is proud of its tax evasion in various countries. In UK it just paid 4 million out of 4.5 billion income and now its public enemy number one. Google has zero creditability in enterprise and nobody is going to adopt it products except some small businesses and blog sites which are basically looking for freebies.

    People are done with Google 'products'.
    Owlll1net
    • Yeah, sure

      You should just shut up and enjoy what capitalism and being big international corporation is about!

      I dont like those companies at all but people who criticies Google, are usually turning blind eye for microsoft, nokia and apple. Like no one is whining how for years has nokia avoided paying taxes to finland when they have got tens of millions support from that country while taxes being between 0 and 250k euros.
      Fri13
      • No, seriously..not good at all.

        If your going for big time productivity, Google Apps=Apple Maps.

        Some have it, some dont.

        If you think MS just wasted the last..how many years now? On Office productivity software, your out of your mind.

        How is anyone ever going to catch up on that?
        Cayble
        • Not good at all

          When are you going to post anything intelligent
          Van Der
    • Troll

      Talk about off topic. Go away Troll!
      Doug0915
    • Why?

      I use Cloud On to access MS Office files online. It has an almost identical interface to MS and opens files without converting. Who needs another program?
      johnfn
      • Because it is worth

        Have you ever used any collaboration features of Google Drive. If I can convert Microsoft office documents into even better Google docs documents that i can share and collaborate in real time with other people , I don't see why I will not use it. Not to mention that Google Apps scales pretty well compared to CloudOn. By the way, how long will CloudOn be free? I can't wait to try it on Android.
        oldman60
    • That's for sure

      I know I won't use this inferior POS.

      No Enterprise is going to use this crap. Small-business might but why would you? You don't use a free razor to shave your face or legs?
      Rob.sharp
      • not sure about face

        but legs - definitely :-)
        ForeverSPb
  • if he was a apple employee

    Why would he defend google ??
    Anthony E
  • And I thought this was for commenting on the article...

    I guess it is really for a few to spout their same old boring crap.

    Oh yeah, Quickoffice, I remember that one. Had it installed on my KYOCERA 7035 smart phone that ran Palm OS, way back when....

    It was a great office product, as I recall. I still have the KYOCERA 7035 in a box along with the folding keyboard, dock and other accessories. Kinda makes me want to charge it up just to see all the stuff I did back then in Quickoffice. I wonder if the battery will charge up....
    coastin
  • Sometimes Google just doesn't make sense

    So the highlight of Quickoffice is that it can convert MS documents so they integrate better with Google Docs?

    Where I stand trying to replace 1 program with 2 is a bad trade off. Especially since the program in the middle, quickoffice, was not designed from the ground up to do what Google is marketing it to do.


    Google should have just made their own app, so it does exactly what they need it to do and it can carry their brand name.

    Quickoffice was the lowest user rated office suite for a reason.
    Emacho
    • Lowest user rated office suite?

      Where did you get the data you base this on?

      From what I see searching around Quickoffice gets pretty good ratings from users. From my own "hands-on" experience using it on a Palm device years ago there was nothing else like it and it worked great. Quickoffice has been around since 1997 and was the only way to read and edit MS Office docs and spreadsheets, etc. on a mobile device back then. Since that time they have kept developing for mobile, something that might be seen as insightful, considering the current mobile marketplace.

      What Google is really acquiring is the employee base. Quickoffice has plenty of developers that know how to work with Microsoft formatted documents and translate them to other formats on a variety of mobile platforms. If Google wants to take a bite out of Microsoft's Office space, they've got to show that they can do everything Microsoft Office does and more. Quickoffice now gives Google a popular office app in the Apple app store. I am surprised this was not covered in the article.
      coastin
      • I didn't say it sucked, just that it was lowest rated

        Back when Google purchased Quickoffice, I looked at the rating in Google Play Store and it was rated at 3.5/5. Every other major office suite was rated 4 or 4.5.

        I'm not debating what Quickoffice is capable of, just that Google should have created their own app much like they have with others. In this case it is really odd, because Google already has a team in Google Docs doing everything you suggest.

        Why add another team working on a totally different project and try to revamp that app into some sort of go between for MS-Office and Google Docs? Why not just make a Google Docs app and skip the transformation of a tool/team that might not work out or offer some confusing dual program solution.
        Emacho
        • OK, I was not under the impression you said it sucked.

          Was just wondering where you got the user data. Thanks for clearing that up.

          As mentioned above this reply: "What Google is really acquiring is the employee base. Quickoffice has plenty of developers that know how to work with Microsoft formatted documents and translate them to other formats on a variety of mobile platforms."
          coastin
          • Perhaps..

            .. Google was just after the employees, but then why would they continue to try to shoehorn Quickoffice as the go between for MSOffice and GoogleDocs.


            It is such a mixed message if this is their Windows8 strategy. Use Quickoffice to convert MSOffice documents to look better on Google Docs.

            Excel, Word, Powerpoint and Onenote are already free with 7gb skydrive (also free)
            Every Windows8RT tablet comes MSOffice installed.

            If Google wants to entice Windows8 users away from MS office, they need to do it with an app that says Google Docs. Maybe Google Docs for desktop or whatever, but it should be branded the same.
            Emacho
        • You have no credibility

          The rating for Quick Office in Google Play Store is 4.1. You are entitled to be a MS fanboy and minder but not entitle to lie with false information.
          Van Der
  • just my personal opinion

    I use MS Office at work on a daily basis, but have Open Office on my home computers. It works fine for just about anything I need to do. MS Office is standard on just about every PC in the company I work for. (Fortune 500 company) but most users would be fine with Open Office. The typical user works in proprietary health care management software most of the day and only use Office to open (and maybe do some minor editing of) standard documents that are sent to them. Quick office and/or Google docs would work just as well.
    Companies have accepted the "MicroSoft Tax" as a cost of doing business for a couple of decades. Many competitors have tried and failed to unseat MS as the standard bearer for business computing. I am not making any predictions about how Google will fare but it is clear that the business computing landscape is changing rapidly. It will be interesting to see how it looks a couple of years from now.
    krossbow
    • so

      It's a tax if you have to buy Office from MS? What if you buy Google Apps? Just a cost of doing business?
      TKR1
      • Yeah the tax comment makes no sense.

        It's clearly cheaper to buy Microsoft Office than have the company develop their own office suite. There are open source alternatives, but that another story completely.
        Sam Wagner