Google's cut-price Nexus 4 disappears from Play stores

Google's cut-price Nexus 4 disappears from Play stores

Summary: A week after the Nexus 5 launch, Google appears to have run out of Nexus 4 supplies.

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Amid the rush for the new LG-made Nexus 5 on Google Play, Google has quietly dropped the device's popular and very cheap predecessor, the Nexus 4, from its stores.

Following last week's launch of Android KitKat 4.4 and the Nexus 5, the Nexus 4 has vanished from Google's Nexus website, which now only includes references to the new smartphone and Google's two tablets — the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10.

The UK Google Play site still contains an entry for the 8GB and 16GB Nexus 4, but notes that they are "no longer available for sale". They're also unavailable at UK resellers Three UK, O2, and reseller Carphone Warehouse, although some appear to be available on Amazon UK. 

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Image: Google Play UK store

After suffering persistent shortages across the globe for the device last year and earlier this year, Google in August drastically cut the price of the Nexus 4 ahead of the Nexus 5 launch, bringing the 8GB model down from £239 to £159 and the 16GB model down from £279 to to £199. The 16GB and 32GB Nexus 5 models are available from £299. 

Consumers looking to buy the unlocked black Nexus 5, which went on sale on Google Play in some markets last Thursday, are currently facing wait times of between two to three weeks for delivery, depending on their location. 

And while Google won't be selling any more Nexus 4 smartphones, current owners will be able to install the new KitKat OS that comes pre-installed with the Nexus 5. However, as reported last week, KitKat will not be available to owners of Samsung's Galaxy Nexus.

ZDNet has asked Google for comment and will include it if any is forthcoming.

Further reading

Topics: Google, Android, Mobility, Smartphones, United Kingdom

Liam Tung

About Liam Tung

Liam Tung is an Australian business technology journalist living a few too many Swedish miles north of Stockholm for his liking. He gained a bachelors degree in economics and arts (cultural studies) at Sydney's Macquarie University, but hacked (without Norse or malicious code for that matter) his way into a career as an enterprise tech, security and telecommunications journalist with ZDNet Australia. These days Liam is a full time freelance technology journalist who writes for several publications.

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