Government destroys final ID cards data

Government destroys final ID cards data

Summary: The government has disposed of the last data from the National Identity Register at an event to mark the occasion in Essex.Home Office minister Damian Green attended the event at data destruction and recycling company RDC on Thursday.

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TOPICS: Security
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The government has disposed of the last data from the National Identity Register at an event to mark the occasion in Essex.

Home Office minister Damian Green attended the event at data destruction and recycling company RDC on Thursday. The last 500 disk drives containing the National Identity Register were magnetically wiped, and shredded.

"Laying ID cards to rest demonstrates the government's commitment to scale back the power of the state and restore civil liberties," said Green in a statement.

The coalition government confirmed that it would scrap the National Identity Register in May 2010. The Identity Documents Bill, which discontinued the scheme, received royal assent on 21 December 2010, and cards ceased to be valid legal documents on 22 January, the Home Office said in a statement on Thursday.

ID cards were opposed by a number of groups, including pilots, who vowed to fight compulsory ID cards in court. The British Airline Pilots' Association (Balpa) told ZDNet UK on Thursday that it was pleased the data had been deleted.

"We fought long and hard to ensure that ID cards did not become adopted [for pilots], and we are very happy that today marks the end of that road," a Balpa spokesman said.

Topic: Security

Tom Espiner

About Tom Espiner

Tom is a technology reporter for ZDNet.com. He covers the security beat, writing about everything from hacking and cybercrime to threats and mitigation. He also focuses on open source and emerging technologies, all the while trying to cut through greenwash.

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3 comments
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  • A lot depends upon the nature your state, it has been quickly forgotten that until very recently Britains parliament consisted of landed gentry, the inheritors of the greatest murderers and thieves of this country, who spent most of its life wealth and blood on wars against its people and those of other nations. Happy to make slaves of each other for personal profit, each castle and country house having its own prison with torture chamber to ensure personal justice.

    Most of our history of the common man is the struggle to remove power from these people, and those among us who wish to become like them.

    The ID card itself did not make Britain a 'Police State', we still have to have ID to prove who we are, what it did do was to give more power to people who should be kept away from it. Including Mr Blunkett. Being bind does not make you a saint, you can still be selfish, arrogant, childish and stupid with a disability. Its just that most adults mange to grow up, and not sell out to vested interests, spending £50 million of taxpayers money on vanity projects.
    L1ma
  • This is a joke. First one government blows up what should have been a simple rationalisation of drivers licence/national insurance no/tax id/passport into an oversized overspecified project and then the next presents its bandonment as a victory for liberty. Tesco, Experian, and Facebook have got a far better handle on your personal data than the government would ever have without a peep from the civil liberty lobby.
    Meegone
  • The whole problem with national identity cards is than no-one trusts the government not to mis-use the data. Plus their legendary incompetence in handling major IT projects and preventing data thefts is a bit of a downer.
    AndyPagin-3879e