Great Beer Only Gets Better at Molson Coors

Great Beer Only Gets Better at Molson Coors

Summary: Making good beer is all about innovation, and for the brewers at Molson Coors, innovation comprises the foundation of their business.

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TOPICS: ÜberTech
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Molson Coors 3

Making good beer is all about innovation.

As generations change and new trends enter the market, brewers have to keep up, take risks, and ensure that their brands are fresh. For the brewers at Molson Coors, innovation comprises the foundation of their business.

They innovate in their products, the way it’s consumed, and even how it’s delivered.

Innovation at its Finest

Since 1959 when Bill Coors and his team developed the first recyclable aluminum beer can, to 1995 when Molson Coors took a risk on "Bellyslide Belgian White" now known as "Blue Moon Belgium White," to the Coors Light Rocky Mountain Cold Activated Bottles and Cans that inform the drinker when their beer is cold enough for perfect consumption... Molson Coors knows how to adapt to new markets and succeed in existing ones. 

With new ideas and brands released consistently through the years, it’s no surprise that Molson Coors is leading the way for internal innovation as well. Acquisitions make up a key portion of the company’s innovation strategy, and to efficiently measure business performance, Molson Coors needed a larger and faster Business Intelligence space. To meet their IT needs, Molson Coors implemented SAP BW powered by SAP HANA.

The new, simplified system allows Molson Coors to develop much faster. The nightly reporting schedule is completed each day by the time the business begins in the morning, providing employees with data easily and on time.

Their new, incredibly fast system allows Molson Coors to analyze data and put it to work for their business with unprecedented speed. They've shortened the time it takes to develop a requested prototype from five days to one. 

In the beer industry, it’s imperative to know what your customer likes and wants, and then predict the next best product based on that knowledge. Molson Coors’ mantra even states that, “Innovation starts and ends with our beer drinkers.” To put that statement into action, the company is now using SAP BW powered by SAP HANA to analyze customer sentiment based on social media. They can see the buzz around their products, and through analyzing consumer tweets and Facebook posts, Molson Coors can determine the best existing markets and the best new markets to dive into.

Tailoring to all Taste Buds

Molson Coors

What happens when you combine customer insight, creativity, curiosity, and a passion for great brewing? You get a variety of products that are targeted to the different variations of beers drinkers and their preferences: Coors Light Iced T, Blue Moon Caramel Apple Spiced Ale, Carling Zest, Molson Canadian 67, and Molson M.

With detailed insight into consumer preference provided by SAP BW powered by SAP HANA, Molson Coors has faith that they can achieve their goal of becoming one of the top four brewers in the world within the next five to ten years. To all the tailgaters, party-goers, bar lovers, and BBQer’s of the world: you can rest easy knowing that Molson Coors is going to keep you stocked with their great tasting products for many years to come. 

The original story appeared on SCN in SAP Business Trends

Topic: ÜberTech

About

Christine Donato is an integrated marketing expert in SAP Global Marketing where she focuses on SAP HANA. She is passionate about improving healthcare with innovation and technology and telling the tale of how technology makes the world run better. @CMDonato

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27 comments
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  • A new journalistic low for ZDnet

    Ok, so now what looks like for the most part a word for word press release about beer?

    I am very disappointed. Usually when I see a female journalist I expect a different slant. This time, there is just nothing at all. How much did Molson pay you?
    dimonic
    • Geez...

      Go back to your cube and look for someone else's fun to ruin.
      sandmich
    • its beer, eh?

      that legitimizes it totally, on that count alone, eh?
      Mac_PC_FenceSitter
    • Great Beer

      More to the point, it's actually the first time I've ever seen the words Molson, Coors and great beer used in the same sentence.
      DJL64
    • Wow, tacky comments

      Also, it is spelled okay, not Ok.
      BubbaJones_
    • Journalistic low

      She's not very good, is she? More like a ham-handed Soviet propagandist. I switched the channel half way through and went directly to the comments section.
      Axel_Redhand
      • 2nd chances?

        Hi Axel- I'm sorry that my writing style lost you half way through. Hopefully you understood that the main point of this story was not to promote a beer company, but to instead highlight the partnership of a booming business and its technology engagement. With the SAP BW powered by SAP HANA engagement, Molson Coors is able to expand its business, speed reporting times, and gather insight into the consumer buying trends via social media analytics. Best, Christine
        ChristineDonato
    • Differing opinions

      Hi dimonic,
      I'm sorry that you were disappointed with this piece. The main point of the story is to show how innovation and technology are helping one company (in this case Molson Coors) grow its business and expand into new and emerging markets. Whether you enjoy Molson products or not, it's safe to say that without its SAP BW powered by SAP HANA engagement, Molson Coors would have less insight into the preferences of customers and would be less able to tailor their new products to changing market trends.
      Best, Christine
      ChristineDonato
  • I reject that statement (and substitute my own)

    Making great beer is not about innovation. It's about careful control of ingredients and process. Novelty is important only for selling beer in the current US market.
    Buster Friendly
    • $100 billion market

      Hi Buster Friendly- The overall U.S. beer market in 2013 capped $100 billion. Therefore, I think it's definitely worth the effort to innovate and adapt to this nation's trends. (source: http://www.brewersassociation.org/statistics/national/) And what better way to innovate than with a software engagement that simplifies the process...
      ChristineDonato
  • WTF! This is Beneath zdnet

    Why are you cluttering this, until now excellent information source with a BEER COMMERCIAL? Cut it out!
    namobo
    • Misssing point

      The big take-away is that someone is using SAP and NOT going out of business.
      sandmich
    • Not just a commercial

      Hi Namobo -

      As I mentioned in a comment above, the main point of this story was not to promote a beer company, but to instead highlight the partnership of a booming business and its technology engagement. With the SAP BW powered by SAP HANA engagement, Molson Coors is able to expand its business, speed reporting times, and gather insight into the consumer buying trends via social media analytics. Best, Christine
      ChristineDonato
  • brand new low.

    nt
    Jean-Pierre-
    • Point Explained

      Hi Jean Pierre-

      The main point of this story was not to promote a beer company, but to instead highlight the partnership of a booming business and its technology engagement. With the SAP BW powered by SAP HANA engagement, Molson Coors is able to expand its business, speed reporting times, and gather insight into the consumer buying trends via social media analytics.
      Best, Christine
      ChristineDonato
  • Still haven't seen any menion of this Great Beer referenced in the headline

    all I read was about Molson Coors...
    William.Farrel
  • I want a free sample

    Rabid Howler Monkey
    • meaning "free as in free beer".

      Rabid Howler Monkey
      • Go to the tasting room

        free doesn't always mean good.
        hoppmang
  • Reads like a paid ad

    I usually refer to such stories as "press release journalism", but I don't think this one even meets that standard.
    John L. Ries