Hacker attacks Victorian servers

Hacker attacks Victorian servers

Summary: Victorian Police has confirmed that it is currently investigating attacks on Melbourne-hosted servers, as reports surface of a hacker named "Ghost Buster" targeting businesses to protest assaults on Indians in Australia.

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Victorian Police has confirmed that it is currently investigating attacks on Melbourne-hosted servers, as reports surface of a hacker named "Ghost Buster" targeting businesses to protest assaults on Indians in Australia.

"The Victoria Police e-crime squad is investigating reports of alleged hacking of a number of different business servers hosted in Melbourne. The ongoing investigation is in its infancy and it would be inappropriate to comment any further," Victoria Police said in a statement.

Although no businesses have been named, ABC Radio's Jon Faine reported that a Melbourne construction business had suffered an attack on its computer servers.

The construction company was reportedly aware of three other businesses and a defence organisation that had experienced the same attack. It cost the construction company around $100,000 to restore data and fix its computer network, according to the report.

The business told the radio program that "Ghost Buster" had left a message on computer servers stating, "Hello!!! Your servers [sic] data have been compromised by Ghost Buster and have been encrypted. If you want your data back you need to contact me... Stop racial attack against Indian people. If you don't then we will be hacking you [sic] f*ing Australian servers everyday. Have a nice day."

This is the second alleged hacking to have been reported in the last year related to violence against Indians in Australia. On 13 July last year, an Indian protester hacked the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) website, leaving a message exhorting the government to take measures to stop violence against Indians.

Over the last week, another attack, this time involving denial-of-service, has been perpetrated by a group calling itself Anonymous. Its attacks have brought the Australian Parliament House website down for the last few days to voice opposition to the Federal Government's proposed internet filter.

Topics: Servers, Government AU, Security

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