Have your say on Wikileaks in our poll

Have your say on Wikileaks in our poll

Summary: Over the last couple of weeks, there's been one topic on everyone's lips: Wikileaks. Commentators have had a field day airing their opinions on the leaked cables and their ramifications. But now we want yours.

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Over the last couple of weeks, there's been one topic on everyone's lips: Wikileaks. Commentators have had a field day airing their opinions on the leaked cables and their ramifications. But now we want yours.

That's why ZDNet sites from across the globe have banded together to create a survey which we'll run over the next two days. It'll give you, and the thousands of other ZDNet readers around the world, a chance to have a say.

So let us know what you really think with these few short questions.

We'll be examining the results later this week and we'll let you know what was said.

(Front page and carousel image credit: Assange image by Espen Moe, CC2.0)

Topics: Government, Government AU, Security

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Talkback

21 comments
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  • The truth hurts ... let him go and be repsonsible for what you say - are you hearing this politicians/diplomats?
    silvervirtualality
  • Wikileaks, ok let’s start publishing comms between the churches, lawyers, reporters, business leaders, gays, scientologists & maybe that next door guy that you don’t like the look of! I am sure we can convince someone that it is in the public’s interest! Let’s get real, this is nothing less than cyber bulling on a grand scale by a group of IT bottom dwellers.
    mdw82
  • Wikileaks, ok let’s start publishing comms between the churches, lawyers, reporters, business leaders, gays, scientologists & maybe that next door guy that you don’t like the look of! I am sure we can convince someone that it is in the public’s interest! Let’s get real, this is nothing less than cyber bulling on a grand scale by a group of IT bottom dwellers.
    mdw82
  • When we elect churche leaders, lawyers, reporters, business leaders, gays, scientologists & maybe that next door guy, then you'd be right. In the meantime stop trampling on my human rights.
    mwil19-a34f7
  • I agree with not publishing gossip. However, it is easy to forget these governments are responsible for deploying our young people into conflicts. This has a direct affect on our collective consciousness, how our government and it's representatives behave has consequences. That is the primary reason transparency is important, it is a clear sign we have developed into a civilised society
    ask412
  • Could this be Jesus reincarnated.
    If these people are offended they should not have said what they said in the first place.
    We in the West have the audacity to force our ideas on other countries about democracy.
    Steve
    stevebehnke
  • What our governments do in our name, as agents elected by us and working on our behalf, should _ALWAYS_ be in the public interest in a democracy.

    If you don't like that, you should move to North Korea...
    Tinman_au
  • "cyber bulling"? as opposed to actual bullying by governments trying to get their way even though the people who elected them demand transparency?
    Hubert Cumberdale
  • It is interesting to note how many people 'expect' our politicians to do and be something we could not and would not do/be. So you want all your innermost secrets revealed; 'ok' lets see a few of those skeletons, i'm waiting!!!!
    No, that's right it is someone else's secrets you want revealed so you can have your glee.
    From my experience the screamers of free speech carry more personal baggage than the average. If they were one tenth as truthful as they are calling 'our elected' officials to be they would have offended everyone they know and probably be a permanent resident of some institution.
    Wasn't it interesting that Julian Assange said recently he needs to reveal all Americas secrets. Not all, international secrets but Americas secrets. It seems a little truth is seeping out after all.
    ezee1noah
  • It's simple. Has he done anything illegal with the Wikileaks site? No, he hasn't! The sexual allegations are a completely different matter, though i'm sure the media and the Americans will choose to confuse the two.
    It's not a matter of opinion. It's a matter of fact. OPINION says that some people agree with him and some don't. FACT says that he has not broken any laws with his cable publications. Breaking the law means you go to jail. Not doing so, means you are entitled to be free. SIMPLE, PRACTICAL, and LOGICAL......
    Magickster
  • Shouldn't the SOURCE be liable for the leak? We could leak information anywhere else, it doesnt have to be wikileaks.
    b3rnt
  • It seems that for the very first time ever politicians will think before they speak and stop their empty spin as we are watching and listening in a bran nu way.
    Fayza-41b23
  • Politicians never want to take responsibility for the downsides of their actions. If they lied, then they should be exposed. It shouldn't take all this, to get that message through.
    mudpuppy-71780
  • Politicians tell lies and get re-elected and overpaid.

    Assange tells the truth and faces jail.
    Treknology
  • This is by no means a simple matter, nor is Mr Assange "telling the truth" because he does not directly own the information. He is the messenger (who of course must be shot because he has embarrassed Governments and Politicians).

    One generous perspective of the Wikileaks scenario is based upon the public protections afforded by "whistleblowing" and "Freedom of Information" statutes, which encourage exposure of information "in the Public Interest". A second perspective is the protection afforded sensitive information by the respective Espionage Act in the US, and Official Secrets Acts of other countries.

    With respect to the former, does the intent of "Public Interest" motives extend beyond the direct interests - of the citizens of the countries directly involved - to the indirect and perhaps aggressive interests of other global citizens attuned to the agendas of de-stabilisation or indeed terrorism? The Governments will punish this naivety.

    With respect to the latter, we would need to look to the Security classification of the information concerned to determine the magnitude of the initial Leak. Media reports the information variously as "confidential" (sic), "secret" (sic) or "top-secret" (sic) in order to achieve maximum effect. In reality, the information is either CLASSIFIED (to whatever level is determined by the author/owner), or UNCLASSIFIED. The initial passing of CLASSIFIED information is a breach of the respective Espionage or Official Secrets acts. The subsequent publication of that information is also a breach, although a little more difficult to prosecute.

    Whatever the facts, Governments and their Administrations have been embarrassed, and they will seek to "get" Mr Assange by whatever means they can. Remember that Al Capone was not punished for Racketeering, but for Tax avoidance offences.
    ganter-a2801
  • Oh, and I also understand that electronic messages are afforded further protection under Post and Telegraph statutes.
    ganter-a2801
  • What might be the motivation for such bullying, mdw82?
    ganter-a2801
  • I think Thomas Jefferson had a good word about this, and how (the US) government should react to the release of embarrassing text. He wrote it down somewhere:

    "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."
    NefariousWheel
  • I'm so over the arrogance of politicians in all so called western democracies who have used confidentiality and secrecy provisions to conceal their hypocrisy and criminality from ordinary plebs. Without genuine transparency it's impossible to hold these bastards to account. Long live Assange and Wikileaks.
    Gollum-6fc39
  • Traditional media has been hand in hand with Governments for years to maintain the status quo, old boys network and the occassional news worthy item. Usually just in time to sell a magazine or newpaper or get the TV ratings up. It is a back scratching arrangement for the elite and priviledged. The 'little guy' to blow the whistle or get the real truth to the masses finds it almost impossible. It is big brother and big business.
    The internet and social networks has changed the content people were once spoon fed from the media and they make their own content now and share it. This is why newspapers are dying all around the world, it is controlled information and not personal enough in a world where something happens you want to know all the details in 15 minutes of the event from your peer group. Gives a reason for conversation.
    Wikileaks really challenges the current controlled release of doctrine. It scares governments and big business that the databases of arrangements and inefficiency are in an instant are global reading for the masses. As long as there is a level of responsibility of veto of this data to stop world wide panic or damage to life.. then it should continue. To me it is a security problem at the source not the publisher who was supplied it. Lets not shoot the messager. To me it is no different to the media we have who release 'scoops' from time to time usually the control the audience in time and context. I think it could be the last chance to have an effective and accountable way for the people to see if and when they are being misled by their government, military and large and small business. The truth cannot hurt that much can it? Now the Genie is out of the bottle sites like this and events like this are going to common place to a point we will not know what to believe.. but we dont believe what we are told now. My 2 cents worth.
    sherlock@...