Hot Java injection for Google App Engine

Hot Java injection for Google App Engine

Summary: Support for Java and cron jobs, and database mobility improvements headline an update to Google's App Engine announced by the search giant today.

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Support for Java and cron jobs, and database mobility improvements headline an update to Google's App Engine announced by the search giant today.

Google describes App Engine as a complete development stack that uses familiar technologies to build and host web applications on Google's own infrastructure.

Peter McKenzie, technical lead for Google Australia, told ZDNet.com.au that the Java implementation would be based around standard application programming interfaces and libraries to ensure deployment to standard J2EE servlet containers including WebSphere and Tomcat. Google's Java support will integrate with Google Web Toolkit and Google Plugin for the Eclipse integrated development environment.

McKenzie said that the Java support was intended to be "feature-equivalent" with the existing Python App Engine support. The preview of App Engine's Java support, launched today, will be restricted to the first 10,000 sign-ups with the intention to garner feedback.

From today, developers will be able to batch import data into App Engine's database, with the ability to export data scheduled for next month. Also, developers will be able to schedule and automatically run jobs via the use of the cron Unix utility.

Google Australia staff contributed towards implementing cron support, with a spokesperson saying that developers will be able to specify dates in plain English rather than the standard non-intuitive cron format.

The search giant also announced Secure Data Connector, a feature which allows the App Engine to connect through an enterprise's firewall to an enterprise's other applications and datastores.

Topics: Google, Big Data, Data Management, Open Source

About

Chris started his journalistic adventure in 2006 as the Editor of Builder AU after originally joining CBS as a programmer. After a Canadian sojourn, he returned in 2011 as the Editor of TechRepublic Australia, and is now the Australian Editor of ZDNet.

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