How much will AMD's new FX-9000 desktop processors cost?

How much will AMD's new FX-9000 desktop processors cost?

Summary: An online retailer priced the forthcoming chips between $500 and $1,000 before removing them from its site. Would AMD really charge that much for its top-performing CPUs?

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TOPICS: Processors, Hardware, PCs
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amd-fx-9000-9590-9370-processor-cpu-price_220

AMD dropped a bombshell at E3 last week with the introduction of its FX-9000 series of desktop CPUs, which includes the first 5GHz processor. But the real surprise might be the cost of these new chips.

Though it's since removed them from its website, online retailer PCSuperStore.com put the FX-9590 and FX-9370 up for pre-order the other day, with prices that were far higher than what AMD has been charging for its top desktop chips. The 4.4GHz FX-9370 (4.7GHz with Turbo Core) was listed for $576, while the 4.7GHz FX-9590, which reaches the magic 5GHz number with Turbo Core, was listed for a whopping $920.

Those prices are closer to high-end Intel Core i7 CPUs than the previous eight-core AMD FX processors, even if the performance gains are roughly 20 percent over prior iterations. However, AMD has not announced any official pricing yet, so it's difficult to determine if PCSuperStore's pricing is accurate or an attempt to cash in on the buzz surrounding the new chips.

It's also unclear when the FX-9000 processors will even be available for DIYers to purchase. There are reports that the new chips will be provided to system builders and not to the general public. Also notable is that the FX-9000 processors are power hogs, with a TDP of 220 watts. Compare that to the Intel Core i7-3970X Extreme Edition, which has a maximum TDP of 150 watts.

While it looked like AMD had ceded the high-end of desktop processors to Intel and chips like the Core i7-3970X, the FX-9000 series might be a worthier challenger than previous FX eight-core chips. But pricing will be critical, especially since the CPUs are bucking the trend of greater power efficiency that Intel is touting with its new Haswell chips.

Are you interested in AMD's new FX-9000 series? At what price would you consider buying one of the new processors if AMD eventually sells them to the public? Let us know in the Talkback section below.

[Via X-bit labs

Topics: Processors, Hardware, PCs

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Talkback

12 comments
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  • amd fx 9000 series

    max 220$ we need a good prices or we will stock with our cpus
    w4rstar
  • new chip

    well thats a little out of my range..being a poor person that lives on SSI...lol
    dnationsr
  • I was hoping...

    someone would mention where AMD is on the design and manufacture die scale. Intel is a 22 nm more or less - where is AMD? Not that it matters when cost, power, speed, and heat are more important - I would just like to know - that is all.
    JCitizen
    • so simple

      Its easy to think or say that chip is 32 nm or 22 nm, the only things to compare are that what you got from smaller die size you can see the superiority of AMD chips that are working more efficiently than intel's smaller die size ...

      AMD APUs on mobile devices have longer battery life with better iGPU .

      So where is intel still behind and never able to compete AMD's 32 nm chips ...
      TariqA6
  • Jury is out

    This is a reason to have a good power supply. I'd reserve judgement until the CPUs are available for testing. My guess right now is that AMD will have to price them near enough to the Haswell i7s to get sales. Gamers probably could care less about the power draw if the unit performs great.
    mballai@...
  • 220 watts?

    No thanks, I don't want to install a cooling tower outside of my tower, let alone outside of my house, to keep my processor cool. That kind of power envelope for a GPU is bad enough.
    Champ_Kind
    • not bad

      AMD's 220 watts @ 5GHz aren't higher, if you have a look at Core i7 3970X have 185 watts @ 3.5GHz so compare the prices and i think AMD FX is a good response ....

      AMD FX 9590 @ 920$

      Core i7 3970X @ $1,029.99

      Seeing is believing ........
      TariqA6
  • around 100 watts more for the life of the cpu equals

    Factoring daily usage, idle voltage ( like new haswell runs 800 mhz at idle ) inflation/ energy cost. It comes out to be a minimum of $150 for the life of the cpu, and double that for heavy users ( professional/ business use non enterprise )
    aberkae
  • haswell 8 core extreme cpus are also coming

    If intel makes a successor to the i7 3930k but with 8 cores for the same price that chip will be favorable even if it doesn't oc to 5ghz.
    aberkae
  • i cant see amd pricing that high.

    If we look back on their previous pricing schemes, we will notice that amd has provided beter cpu cycles per dolor then intel over the past five years. I am personally seing the 9370 taking up the price of initial price of the 8350 and the 9590 being somewhere in the low $300's.

    But I'm only guessing. They could go full on intel and plunder our wallets for only minor performance gaines over the competition.
    rockfanMCE
  • NOT HIGHER

    The prices of FX 9000 isn't higher as AMD always less cost for upgrading like no socket change usually, but Intel always come with new socket so extra expenses occur all time ...

    AMD's love to their consumer's
    TariqA6
  • I just Bought MIne

    I bought the CPU and Motherboard from Computer Masters in OKC. I had them build a cool computer mounted in a five level bookshelf with a solid glass front and a real antique looking fan mounted on the right side of the bookshelf that keeps everything cool the fan was a new oscillating one that they took apart. Computer masters will modify the existing build with in the bottom shelf to install a water cooler for the cpu. I will use my current 5850 toxic graphics until the new one comes out in a few months. Leave me your emails and I will forward pictures in a week.
    Macsoap