HP chief executive Whitman appointed chair of the board

HP chief executive Whitman appointed chair of the board

Summary: The company's president and chief executive now has another feather in her corporate hat, as the chair of the computer giant's board.

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TOPICS: Hewlett-Packard, PCs
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(Image via CNET/CBS Interactive)

HP's president and chief executive Meg Whitman has been appointed chair of the board, the computing giant announced Thursday.

In a brief statement, the company said Whitman, who has been at the company since September 2011, will bring the number to a round one-dozen members. 

Pat Russo, former Alcatel-Lucent chief executive, now serves as the company's lead independent director.

Whitman replaces Ralph Whitworth, who replaced Ray Lane when he stepped down in the aftermath of the downfall of former chief executive Leo Apotheker.

During his tenure, Whitworth hired Whitman to serve as the company's boss upon Apotheker's departure.

HP ($HPQ) closed on the New York Stock Exchange down by 1.1 percent. 

Topics: Hewlett-Packard, PCs

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6 comments
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  • Meg "leader"

    The substitute decision to Whitworth for Meg is found, she knows all the facets of its company, nobody better than Meg to preside over, HP is view like a company leader in many facets in the IT world
    luis river
  • Meg "leader"

    The substitute decision to Whitworth for Meg is found, she knows all the facets of its company, nobody better than Meg to preside over, HP is view like a company leader in many facets in the IT world
    luis river
  • I never think that's a good idea

    Executive leadership should always be separate from corporate governance leadership. Find someone chummy if you must - if the CEO feels she needs a freer hand - but make sure there's oversight.
    Mac_PC_FenceSitter
    • Theoretically...

      ...the rest of the board is supposed to supervise the CEO, but wielding the gavel means you get to set the agenda, which makes oversight somewhat harder.
      John L. Ries
      • She also becomes doubly accountable, since, as CEO and Chairman,

        she had better be a lot more productive and accountable.

        A CEO can come and go, but, as a Chairperson, she is going to have to face the other Chairpeople face to face.

        Besides, there is nothing that says that a person in management can't also be good as a chairperson.
        adornoe1
        • Conflict of interest

          It's the job of the board to supervise management, which is harder to do when the CEO holds the gavel. It means she gets to set the agenda of board meetings and thus gets a fair amount of control over what the board sees and discusses.

          It's about like the British Prime Minister serving simultaneously as Speaker of the House of Commons.
          John L. Ries