HP takes Android PCs commercial

HP takes Android PCs commercial

Summary: HP reckons that the Android all-in-one would be useful as a kiosk, in verticals such as hospitality and travel and the SMB market.

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Hewlett-Packard on Monday launched an enterprise friendly Android all-in-one that'll start at $399.

The move, outlined at the Consumer Electronics Show 2014, comes just a few hours after Lenovo launched an Android all-in-one designed for the living room. HP's Slate Pro AiO will run Android 4.3 with an Nvidia Tegra 4 quad-core processor. For good measure, HP is including Kingsoft Office Suite, Box storage and Citrix Receiver for Windows application support.

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HP's Android all-in-one will be available March 6. The 21.5-inch PC has a touchscreen and can recline at a 70-degree angle. HP reckons that the Android all-in-one would be useful as a kiosk or in verticals such as hospitality and travel.

hp android all in one

Why not a Chrome OS PC? "Chrome doesn't allow for a lot of customization and you don't have the freedom to manage them," said Pavana Polineni, senior product marketing manger at HP. Polineni added that Google Play has more apps for both personal use and business and that Android 4.3 added a bevy of security features that make it more enterprise friendly.

Meanwhile, HP tweaked its code so that its all-in-one could display all Android apps in both portrait and landscape mode.

Polineni said that the Android all-in-one could also find small business traction due to the price point and familiarity with the mobile operating system.

HP's commercial computing rollout takes cues from many mobile touchpoints beyond the Android all-in-ones. Here's a look at the other products for business outlined at CES:

  • ProOne 400 AiO: This all-in-one PC is a 19.5-inch PC that starts at $749. The device, available Feb. 3, is tailored for video and audio conferencing and runs that latest Intel Core processors. A 21.5-inch version will be available March 31 for $799.
  • HP 205 AiO. Another all-in-one that runs on AMD processors and starts at $449. The display is 18.5 inches.
  • HP 200 MicroTower uses Intel Pentium or Celeron Processors, Windows 8.1 or Windows 7 and has a design with easy port access starting at $349.
  • HP Pro x2 410 is a commercial notebook with a detachable screen so it can be used as a laptop or tablet for $899. The screen is 11.6 inches and there's a full-size keyboard.
  • The HP 350 G1 is a business notebook that'll run on a variety of Intel processors.

Topics: Android, Hewlett-Packard, CES, PCs, CES 2014: What the Professionals Need to Know

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15 comments
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  • Nice

    Looks like HP is finally serious about this Android business.
    symbolset
    • Not sure if I'd agree with that at the moment

      HP hasn't seemed to be serious about anything computer wise theses last couple of years.

      Short lived OS, a back on forth on whether they're going to be in the hardware business, ect.

      Lets see if they put serious muscle behind this or not.
      NoMore MicrosoftEver
      • To be fair

        This is a refresh of an Android all in one they have been selling for a year.
        symbolset
        • It's not really a refresh... but rather a market refocus...

          I've seen the previous one and it looks like a toy. The idea is good but the price isn't right at the moment.

          They need to rethink the build quality, the materials and even the looks so it's completely different from what Windows offers and it's not seen just as an inexpensive knock off.

          They could take a hint from their Monitor line and create something more appealing from a industrial design focus.

          The reduce expense and size of the Android ecosystem components could allow a slimmer case (ala new iMac) or even a more aggressive stand.
          cosuna
          • !!

            "They need to rethink the build quality, the materials and even the looks"

            "more appealing from a industrial design focus."

            "..could allow a slimmer case (ala new iMac) "

            While I don't disagree with consuna, it's intriguing that this post has been received so well.

            If a such suggestions were made regarding any Apple product, the author would be crucified and heckled to death by people scream "Apple fanbois are all about looks..."
            StandardPerson
  • Yeah except...

    The biggest problem with Android... It is not going to be business friendly much longer if the idiot Schmidt keeps pushing Google+ on everyone. Many institutions block social networking sites and G+ is not an exception.

    For me Windows, Ubuntu, or OS X would be more welcomed than Android right now!
    slickjim
    • Sounds like you are being alarmist, to me...

      "It is not going to be business friendly much longer if..."

      So you can see a nightmare scenario in your crystal ball. Good for you.

      And then there's Android in the Real World, which is the one that HP is using.
      Zogg
      • Nope

        Being a realist... Sure you can side load Apps but, what company is going to move away from Config Manager for this style of deployment?

        So, that goes back to Google Plus and Google cramming it down your throat at every turn, including at ID Creation... I mean, it isn't like they have a real world enterprise server to manage these connections yet is it?

        Also, what they're doing right now is similar to what MS did with IE and look where that got them?
        slickjim
        • You ARE being alarmist.

          "Also, what they're doing right now is similar to what MS did with IE and look where that got them?"

          IE earned MS an anti-trust conviction - there's a lesson there. So where's the anti-trust suit against Google for Android? Here's a thought - maybe the threat of an anti-trust suit will *prevent* your nightmare from coming true?
          Zogg
          • He's not an ALARMIST, he's a MS shill or troll....

            Don't you get his Weasel word that come directly from the Scroogle Playbook:

            1) "what company is going to move away from Config Manager (aka System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager) for this style of deployment"

            2) "goes back to Google Plus and Google cramming it down your throat at every turn, including at ID Creation... I mean, it isn't like they have a real world enterprise server to manage these connections yet is it?"

            Only the last comment concerning IE hints otherwise, but it's clearly moves the conversation back to what MS "learned" that make them better than Android.
            cosuna
    • needs are different

      Businesses that are open to social networking will use Android.
      Businesses that want a walled garden will use OS X.
      ...simple as that.
      Ne0Freedom
      • Yes but...

        Banking? Healthcare? Places where you cannot risk information being exposed cannot allow these connections and if they do now, it is only a matter of time before they stop.
        slickjim
    • You can always opt out from Google standard and fork Android...

      ...just like Amazon.

      The full code is open and easily adapted to the OEM needs.
      cosuna
  • If HP still thought like Microsoft...

    ...they would insist that they still run WebOS or dual boot both OS.

    They would have created a full "WebOS" which would run Palm legacy apps and WebOS apps in two completely different modes. They would create the two header monster WebOS Pro and the one that run only the new apps, WebOS RT.

    Next they would create a entirely new and different OS called WebOS Phone which would look like WebOS RT, but would run completely different apps in a completely different store.

    When their TouchPad sales were flat, they would say that it's because it needs time, that people need to know the new apps and they will get used to them in time.

    The TouchPad Pro would fare no better, with people preferring iPads and Android. They would claim that both TouchPad could do more than the iPad and that people were just resisting change.

    Later, legacy Palm sales would outnumber WebOS sales and people would install software to bypass the whole WebOS environment while continue to use Palm 20 year old software.

    In the end, Intel would create an environment to run both WebOS, Palm and Android in the same system and HP would fight it with all its force just to see their market share diminish by the second.

    LOL.
    cosuna
    • Typo...

      "They would have created a full "WebOS" which would run Palm legacy apps and WebOS apps in two completely different modes. They would CALL the two header monster: WebOS Pro; and FOR THE one that only RUNS the new apps THE NAME WOULD BE: WebOS RT."
      cosuna