iiNet: AFACT appeal will not stop piracy

iiNet: AFACT appeal will not stop piracy

Summary: iiNet chief Michael Malone today said that another court challenge to last month's Full Federal Court judgement will not stop illegal downloading even if successful.

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iiNet chief Michael Malone today said that another court challenge to last month's Full Federal Court judgement will not stop illegal downloading even if successful.

The response comes as the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft (AFACT) today announced that it will continue court action against iiNet, seeking to appeal its case to the High Court. Malone said more legal proceedings were not a solution, adding that the two-year court case had "not stopped one illegal download".

Further appeals, Malone said, will not stop piracy.

"People are crying out to access the studios' materials, so much so some are prepared to steal it. A more effective approach would be for the studios to make their content more readily and cheaply available online," he said.

"But we also recognise that regardless of the availability of timely, reasonably priced content, some individuals will continue to try to source content illegally."

In a statement released last week, iiNet recommended that an independent third party to police internet copyright infringement would be more effective.

"Our model addresses ISP concerns but is one we think remains attractive to all participants, including the sustainable strategy of an impartial referee for the resolution of disputes and the issue of penalties for offenders," said Malone, adding that an independent umpire was the only way to ensure natural justice.

This, he argued, would protect customer privacy and allow copyright owners rights "to pursue alleged infringers".

Topics: Telcos, Government AU

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  • At best, it will stop "piracy" through iiNet, but with the advent of Torrent encryption products how is any IAP expected to police this? If I were Torrenting legitimate Linux materials, I would still use encryption just to frustrate those who seek to dictate what we can and can't do.
    Treknology
  • The only thing that will stop piracy is to sell media/movies online at a realistic and fair price. Since the companies behind AFACT have no intention of doing this there only option is to sue the world into oblivion. I don't think there is any doubt who the bad guys are here cause it sure isn't the poor ISPs and public who only want fair access. I have zero sympathy for the AFACT cartel and wish they implode in their own greed and arrogance.
    nissy-2f939