iiNet confirms NBN pricing

iiNet confirms NBN pricing

Summary: National broadband provider iiNet this morning confirmed its final pricing plans for its National Broadband Network fibre offerings in the early stage roll-out sites in Tasmania, noting also that it had signed up its first customers of the service.

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TOPICS: Broadband, Telcos, NBN
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National broadband provider iiNet this morning confirmed its final pricing plans for its National Broadband Network fibre offerings in the early stage roll-out sites in Tasmania, noting also that it had signed up its first customers of the service.

iiNet NBN Plans

(Credit: iiNet)

The plans do not differ markedly from the iiNet's expected NBN pricing announced some time ago.

iiNet chief executive Michael Malone claimed line honours for the first customers to have signed up for NBN plans in a statement this morning, although rival Primus was known to have already signed up customers when it launched its own plans several weeks ago.

Malone said the first iiNet customers would be connected "as soon as Tasmania NBN Co was ready to flick the switch". In the weeks ahead, iiNet would commence a new marketing campaign that would see residents in the early stage roll-out areas of Midway Point, Smithton and Scottsdale would receive a "special orange envelope" in their mailbox promoting iiNet's services.

"Yep, we think it's kind of cute that we are using 'snail mail' to encourage Australians to connect to the fastest internet service the country has ever seen," he said.

iiNet will offer customers who sign up before 30 September a deal with zero set-up costs if they sign up to a 24-month plan — waiving costs for in-home wiring required to get the NBN connected, normally around $180, according to the internet service provider.

The offer will also see customers provided with iiNet's BoB wireless modem and phone unit, which is normally valued at $269 plus any account set-up fees.

"NBN fibre customers will also have the option to sign up to iiNet's iiTalkpack product if they choose; the iiTalkpack costs $9.95 a month, including all local and national calls, with very competitive rates on mobile, international, and 13 and 1300 numbers," iiNet's statement said. Customers will also be able to sign-up to iiNet's FetchTV IPTV offering, which has not yet been released publicly.

However, it remains unclear whether iiNet's internet telephony service will be provided through its BoB device — with the included analog telephone adapter — or whether it will use the analog telephone plug, which the NBN will see installed in people's homes.

Topics: Broadband, Telcos, NBN

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5 comments
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  • Hmmm. And how much are their excess data fees going to be and how slow are you going to be shaped? At 100 Mbps, 60GB or 90GB aint gonna last very long. Serious browsing would rip through that in less than a week. Until Australia gets the cost of internet access down and stops charging quotas, these high access speeds are simply a marketing toy - 100Mbps Fibre!!! fine print = until you use the piddly data allowance and then you are shaped at sub DSL speeds for weeks. I would be interested to know if any of the Asian countries offering similar speeds use quotas? I think not (I know they don't in JP).
    grdollar
  • Why are iiNet offering plans with on- and off-peak quotas? I can understand the reasoning on the current copper network (so they don't suffer congestion issues at peak times) but do they honestly think that the NBN will suffer congestion issues?
    NRL_Lover
  • Am I missing something here? Why would anyone choose Fiber 1 if they can choose Fiber 2 for the same price and receive an extra 10gigs.
    I wish Australia didn't have internet allowances.
    IntoTheB
  • Quota's, speed differential per plan $$, Peak/Off Peak allowances, Asyncronous up/download speeds....it all goes through the same pipe and electronics and at the same speed...methinks some marketing bod is trying to gouge maximum profit by overlaying the 'old' DSL pricing structure and methodology.
    happyidiot
  • If it's like iiNets broadband service then a lot of content will be quota free so I expect that the high speeds will still be pretty useful. They don't charge for going over the cap now but I am interested in how much they'll slow you down on exceeding the limit. Overall though, I kinda expected the NBN to produce lower prices than this... maybe I was dreaming but I can't see how this is such a better deal than what we currently have!
    chadwyn-15e8d