Illustrator CS6

Illustrator CS6

Summary: The new features in Illustrator CS6 concentrate on making the program faster, better organised and easier to work with. Tracing and creating patterns, in particular, get big improvements.

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  • Advanced tracing options
    You can still go in and work with the full range of tracing options. You can drag the slider to control how many of the colours from the original image are reproduced, or click Advanced and choose how closely the validation paths fit the original shapes in the photo, how pronounced the angles of the curves are, whether paths overlap or not, whether to keep curved lines curved or straighten them and whether to simplify the image by ignoring very small shapes. This gives you fine control when you want something more stylised than photorealistic; click the eye icon next to the View drop-down to see the original photo for comparison.

  • Patterns made easy
    If you're using Illustrator to draw or for commercial illustration, you need to be able to create patterns — for wallpaper, for fabric or for effects like grass where you want to have the same element repeating over and over again. In previous versions you had to do this by laboriously grouping, duplicating and arranging multiple objects. In Illustrator CS6 you select the objects and choose Object / Pattern / Make and you have a new pattern on the Swatches panel to use as a fill. You can choose how to lay out the tiles of your pattern; in rows and columns, overlapping like bricks or in a hexagon arrangement. And the objects in the pattern are always live and editable if you need to make changes later on.

  • More gradient options
    When you apply a gradient of one or more colours to a stroke, Illustrator CS6 gives you more options for how the colours are applied. A gradient that runs from one side of a complex shape to another doesn't look very natural — the spiral on the upper left has a gradient running within the stroke and if that was part of a drawing, it probably wouldn't be the effect you require. Applying the gradient along the stroke, like the spiral on the right, or across the stroke as in the spiral below provides a more realistic effect in a complex image.

Topics: Apps, Reviews, Software

Mary Branscombe

About Mary Branscombe

Mary Branscombe is a freelance tech journalist. Mary has been a technology writer for nearly two decades, covering everything from early versions of Windows and Office to the first smartphones, the arrival of the web and most things inbetween.

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