In 2012, which tech firms did you want to work for?

In 2012, which tech firms did you want to work for?

Summary: European job seekers may have to pick at the remains of the recruitment industry, but in an ideal world, which tech firms are the most attractive?

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image by Håkan Dahlström

It hasn't been an easy few years for job seekers, whether looking for a new employer or fresh from college.

An unstable global economy, public sector cuts, and the folding of SMBs to top firms is making job hunting even more difficult. Even if you find a job -- as a recent survey suggested -- you may be spending your spare time hunting for another one. When 48 percent of employees worldwide say that they are still on the hunt for advancement opportunities, more flexible schedules or simply enjoy job-hopping, a problem for the enterprise comes to mind. 

How can you ensure that the time, money and effort spent training employees doesn't go to waste? Perhaps take a tip from businesses that are deemed attractive by European job seekers.

According to employer branding firm Universum's new report titled "Europe's Most Attractive Employers 2012," the preferences of over 85,000 job seekers with a background in business or engineering ranked Internet Google and car manufacturer BMW as the top businesses job seekers wanted to work for.

Universum's European talent attraction index separates business and engineering into two categories. Unsurprisingly -- considering the tech giant's benefits and reputation -- Google claimed the top spot. The California-based company is followed by L'Oréal, Ernst & Young, Procter & Gamble and KPMG in the European rankings.

Within the engineering field, BMW claims the top spot. The German car manufacturing group is not the only big-brand name to hit the list, as the company is closely followed by IBM and Siemens.

Google and Microsoft both secured a top-ten place within each category.

Meanwhile, in America, Glassdoor said that Facebook was the best tech firm to work for last year. Google managed to secure fifth place, whereas Microsoft was nowhere to be seen on the top 50 companies to work for rank table. Glassdoor claimed that the the best U.S. company to work for was Bain & Company. 

Check out the top 20 ranking firms below:

Ideal Employer Rankings universum engineering business grads job seeker
Credit: Universum

 

Topics: Education, EU, Enterprise 2.0

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2 comments
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  • 1 volunteer worth 10 pressed men

    May I work for HMRC in the UK?

    I'd like to fine all the greedy tax avoidance companies headquartered in the US at least twice their evasion, apologies 'unethical but legal mitigation', amounts.

    No, I don't mind shutting down their UK operation: that means everyone can stick with the eminently usable Office 2007, instead of paying a fortune in subscriptions for evermore for a nano-functional increase in 2013.
    jacksonjohn
  • Dubious methods produce dubious results.

    Toddybottom did a pretty good job of summing up the flaws/hoops Glassdoor put in place to skew results far from reality. It's the first comment in the article you linked.

    Also
    Why did you call out Microsoft specifically? It's ok to be biased, but at least admit it somewhere in the article.
    TechNickle