Inside Capgemini's free-cooled datacentre

Inside Capgemini's free-cooled datacentre

Summary: ZDNet UK has toured Merlin, Capgemini's sustainable, modular, energy-efficient 10,000-square-foot datacentre that has plans to be scaled up to three times that capacity

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TOPICS: Networking
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  • The method used in the datacentre for cooling and recycling the air is a five-stage process. The air first passes through a filter, then a set of filter bags, a direct-expansion chilling system, an adiabatic pre-evaporative cooling system (pictured) and finally a series of fans. The direct-expansion chilling is not powered by default, but the electricity kicks in if the ambient air temperature is registered as too high. Adiabatic cooling works by drawing the air through a filter, which is cooled by water. This helps to dissipate the heat and prevent evaporation.

    Under full load, the air can rush through the cooling chambers at a pressure of almost 300 pounds per square inch.

  • To maximise the efficiency of free air cooling in the datacentre, unused racks are carefully sealed to maintain pressure and eliminate undesired airflow.

  • Here is where power is supplied to the racks. Each fully-loaded module can draw down a maximum power load of 232kW.

    The facility is currently being certified by the Uptime Institute as a Tier 3 facility. This requires the facility to have multiple redundant capacity components and multiple distribution paths serving the computer equipment, hence the two separate power cables.

Topic: Networking

Jack Clark

About Jack Clark

Currently a reporter for ZDNet UK, I previously worked as a technology researcher and reporter for a London-based news agency.

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