Inside Logitech's video labs for optical design, 3D prototyping

Inside Logitech's video labs for optical design, 3D prototyping

Summary: Let's take a stroll through Logitech's new video labs for optical and audio testing in Silicon Valley.

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  • NEWARK, CALIF. -- While famous for personal webcams and other computer peripherals, Logitech has also been busy focusing on producing new cameras from the ground up for home offices and small businesses.

    The computer gadgets company hosted a small group of reporters and analysts on Thursday during a tour of its new Silicon Valley video laboratories.

    In explaining the motivations behind some of the company's latest business-focused products. Logitech executives asserted that the videoconferencing market is going through a dramatic change.

    Citing recent Forrester Research, Logitech said that a third of U.S. enterprises are expanding or upgrading deployments while another 18 percent are at least planning new implementations of the technology.

    Thus, this is somewhere that Logitech wants to be and eventually dominate. Here's a peek inside Logitech's video labs in the Bay Area as the company works to achieve those goals.

  • AUDIO ROOM

    Logitech's audio room is situated on the first floor of the building for a specific reason. Also requiring concrete flooring, this eliminates the possibility of vibrations, which would throw off sound testing, if the lab was on the second floor or higher.

    It's here that Logitech's audio engineering team sets up microphones and runs tests based on quality standards that company reps said that Logitech has "developed through years of experience."

    Being inside the room was almost an eerie experience because as soon as you cross the threshold, the ambient noise is all but gone, making voices sound very muted. Engineers also said that the room has been designed to shield itself from stray radio waves.

Topics: Hardware, Collaboration, Software Development, Enterprise 2.0, Tech Industry

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  • Everything looks sooo boring.

    Engineers must be taking drugs to stay alive in that completely uninspiring place.
    tetraclit