Intel 'Medfield' chip ready for Ice Cream Sandwich

Intel 'Medfield' chip ready for Ice Cream Sandwich

Summary: The most recent version of the Google Android operating system, called Ice Cream Sandwich, is ready to run on devices powered by Intel's 'Medfield' processor.A spokesperson for Intel confirmed that Ice Cream Sandwich would be supported on upcoming Intel Atom Medfield-based devices on Monday.

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TOPICS: Mobility
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The most recent version of the Google Android operating system, called Ice Cream Sandwich, is ready to run on devices powered by Intel's 'Medfield' processor.

A spokesperson for Intel confirmed that Ice Cream Sandwich would be supported on upcoming Intel Atom Medfield-based devices on Monday.

"Google Android Ice Cream Sandwich will be supported on upcoming Intel 'Medfield' processor-based devices, and Intel continues to work closely with Google to optimise Ice Cream Sandwich for future smartphones and tablets based on Intel Atom processors," an Intel spokesman confirmed.

While the spokesman could not give any release details of specific smartphones or tablets that will use the Medfield chip, he added that device manufacturers and app developers already have access to all the code they need to get started.

"Intel optimisations for Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich are available today to ODMs (Original Design Manufacturer) and OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturer) using the Intel Android BSP (Board Support Package), as well as developers working with us on NDK (Native Development Kit) apps in advance of Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich-based x86 devices being available commercially," he said.

The introduction of the Medfield chip will be vital to Intel's mobile strategy which has so far failed to gain traction in the smartphone and tablet markets.

In May, Intel chief Paul Otellini said that Medfield phones would be reaching the market during 2012.

The 32nm Medfield processor is the successor to the 45nm Moorestown processor that found its way into a few notebooks, such as the Nokia Booklet 3G, but failed to make inroads on the smartphone segment.

The company hopes to reduce Medfield to a 22nm production process in 2013 and 14nm in 2014, which should reduce the amount of power the processor needs to work.

Topic: Mobility

Ben Woods

About Ben Woods

With several years' experience covering everything in the world of telecoms and mobility, Ben's your man if it involves a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or any other piece of tech small enough to carry around with you.

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