Intel's Mooly brings new core, NBN praise

Intel's Mooly brings new core, NBN praise

Summary: In his first visit down under, Intel vice president and general manager, PC Client Group, Shmuel "Mooly" Eden last night demonstrated the company's vaunted second-generation core processors, also known as "Sandy Bridge", to the gathered Australian IT industry.

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In his first visit down under, Intel vice president and general manager, PC Client Group, Shmuel "Mooly" Eden last night demonstrated the company's vaunted second-generation core processors, also known as "Sandy Bridge", to the gathered Australian IT industry.

Mooly Eden

The raw sheet metal from which the new processors are cut. (Credit: Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

Mooly wowed the audience with practical and technical demonstrations of the processors, showing everything from raw power to games, right through to the company's new Intel Insider high-definition movie-streaming service.

The new Intel Insider service creates a secure link between film distributors, like Warner Bros and Dreamworks Pictures, and streams high-definition movies to a second-generation Intel core-enabled processor after films have had their run in the cinemas.

This on-demand content is still being negotiated for local release; however, Mooly told the audience that Australia is in a great position for products like Intel Insider because of its new infrastructure flagship — the National Broadband Network (NBN).

"HD-streaming content is ripe for fast networks like your national broadband project," said Mooly, a viewpoint which has previously drawn scorn from coalition critics.

Motion capture

A motion capture demo sees Mooly's head recreated and made to serve as an avatar. (Credit: Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

In December, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott and Shadow Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull said that the NBN ought to be renamed the "Nationalised Broadcasting Network", as it would be primarily used for streaming high-definition movies, television, IPTV and gaming.

Abbott also slammed the NBN once again yesterday, calling for the massive infrastructure undertaking to be put on hold in order to pay for clean-up of the Queensland flood disaster.

"The National Broadband Network is a luxury that Australia cannot now afford. The one thing you don't do is redo your bathroom when your roof has just been blown off," said Abbott.

The clean-up bill for the devastating flood crisis is set to reach $30 billion, according to some economists.

Pirates to the core

When asked about whether he plans to stop piracy with the Intel Insider streaming platform, Mooly said that stopping piracy was never his goal.

"Nobody will be able to stop piracy," he said.

"You will still be able to get your [pirated] content, but there are many people who are willing to pay to get HD content. I didn't do Intel Insider because it would keep studio pockets lined, I did it for the users," Mooly added.

Topics: Intel, Broadband, Piracy, Security, NBN

Luke Hopewell

About Luke Hopewell

A fresh recruit onto the tech journalism battlefield, Luke Hopewell is eager to see some action. After a tour of duty in the belly of the Telstra beast, he is keen to report big stories on the enterprise beat. Drawing on past experience in radio, print and magazine, he plans to ask all the tough questions you want answered.

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