Internode connects first NBN Kiama customer

Internode connects first NBN Kiama customer

Summary: The National Broadband Network (NBN) has begun switching on trial customers in the New South Wales first release site of Kiama Downs, with Internode boasting its first connection today.

SHARE:
TOPICS: NBN, Broadband, Telcos
8

The National Broadband Network (NBN) has begun switching on trial customers in the New South Wales first release site of Kiama Downs, with Internode boasting its first connection today.

The lucky customer is Paul Gosney, a professional freelance photographer who moved with his wife and two children from Lane Cove to Minnamurra (located in NSW's south coast) in April this year. He moved specifically to be one of the first people connected to the Federal Government's $35.9 billion fibre network.

"I decided the NBN meant we weren't going to be disadvantaged by moving from Sydney and, indeed, it might even give us certain advantages. With 95 per cent of my work still based in Sydney or in places that I get to from an airport, that was an important factor in planning our lifestyle change," he said in a statement.

Gosney said that the NBN would allow him to deliver large photograph files electronically.

"Often, I've delivered images on DVD because average jobs can range in size from as little as 300 megabytes to as large as four gigabytes. While that fits on a DVD, it takes a long time to upload over ADSL. With an NBN service running at 100 megabits per second downstream, and 40 up, those files will be delivered in minutes rather than hours," he said.

The Kiama NBN first release site covers 2343 homes in total. As of December 2010, 1764 homeowners (75 per cent) had consented to have NBN Co install fibre to their homes, although these homes will then have to sign up with an internet service provider (ISP) to receive a service.

Internode last month also connected one of the first trial customers in the South Australian first release site of Willunga, and was one of a number of telcos to connect customers in Armidale.

The provider has also sparked controversy this week, as it announced commercial NBN pricing in Tasmania that many believe to be much higher than today's ADSL2+ broadband pricing plans, leading some to question the accuracy of the NBN's business case.

Topics: NBN, Broadband, Telcos

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

8 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • I hope that justifies the billions of dollars being spent !
    sceptic-eaef7
    • That's a bit like the old unit cost fallacy, where the first car off the assembly line costs $100 million. But the second, and the third and all the ones after that only cost a few thousand each...
      Gwyntaglaw
  • Didn't anyone tell this poor man that if no one else is on NBN his files won't get there any faster.
    boff-9ed0f
    • Hello boff - I happen to be that poor man and I can tell you that the majority of publishers I deal with already have big fat internet pipes as they've been pushing large files all over the globe for years now. Now I have a connection that can keep up with them ;-)
      iclick-3c948
  • Now Josh, tell me about this sentence:

    "The provider has also sparked controversy this week, as it announced commercial NBN pricing in Tasmania that many believe to be much higher than today's ADSL2+ broadband pricing plans, leading some to question the accuracy of the NBN's business case."

    "Many believe to be much higher"? Now come on! You can use the "many believe" or "some say" dodge when bridging a gap in subjective opinion - but when you're comparing objective prices?

    Imagine if you said "many believe basketballer Yao Ming to be much taller than the average Chinese man"? Sounds ridiculous, right?
    Gwyntaglaw
    • Hi Gwyntaglaw,

      Both Turnbull and a number of commenters have raised the price issue since yesterday, so in this instance, I would say "many" is an appropriate term.

      Cheers,

      Josh
      Josh Taylor
      • The problem Josh is not with "many" but with "believe". This is an objective matter - are the prices higher, or aren't they? These are straightforward numbers, there is no point asking anyone what they believe when you, the journalist, can establish the truth.

        Then you can say that people "assert", "claim", or "point out" something. And wonder of wonders, you can then *tell us whether their assertion is correct*.

        The sickness of Journalists acting as stenographers for claim and counter-claim, and never attempting to establish the truth themselves has clearly now spread so far that even simple statements of whether one number is higher than another are matters of opinion. It seems now that to state that 2+2=4 would be evidence of bias if there's someone in public life claiming that it equals five.
        Viv3ka
  • Turnbull is one and "commentators" could be 2. What is the number and does it matter anyway?
    Listohan