Internode reveals NBN commercial pricing

Internode reveals NBN commercial pricing

Summary: Internode has released commercial pricing for its National Broadband Network (NBN) services, although the company has indicated that the prices could rise because of NBN Co's "flaws" in its pricing model.

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TOPICS: Broadband, Telcos, NBN
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Internode has released commercial pricing for its National Broadband Network (NBN) services, although the company has indicated that the prices could rise because of NBN Co's "flaws" in its pricing model.

All of the services that the internet service provider (ISP) is offering over the NBN will be bundled with a telephone service, with $10 included call credit a month.

The cheapest Internode plan, which plods along at 12Mbps/1Mbps, costs $59.95 per month for 30GB. 1TB at that speed costs $149.95 per month.

For those who want to get the best NBN speeds, 30GB at 100Mbps/40Mbps will cost $99.95 per month, and 1TB will cost $189.95 per month.

(Credit: Internode)

Uploads and downloads are being counted towards a user's quota. Once the quota is reached, shaping is applied, unless the user buys an additional Data Block.

Additional features, such as fixed IP addresses or priority business customer support, can be obtained by buying a power pack for $10 extra per month, or a business pack for $30 per month.

By comparison, Telstra's bundled 100Mbps/2Mbps hybrid fibre-coaxial service costs $79.95 per month for 200GB of download.

The new pricing will apply from the initial commercial launch of Internode's NBN Co-based services, which will happen when NBN Co says that an area is ready for commercial services, according to the telco. This is expected to happen in September or October.

However, Internode managing director Simon Hackett warned that the prices could go up in the future due to "existing flaws in the NBN Co wholesale charging model".

In an accompanying blog, Hackett said that NBN Co's "arbitrary" $20-per-megabit connectivity virtual circuit (CVC) charge imposes massive overhead costs for retail service providers, and suggested that to avoid this high cost, NBN Co should provide the first 200 megabits free of charge.

Those on the mainland who have been connected are paying their normal ADSL price, while getting NBN speeds. In Tasmania, there was a low-priced schedule created to take pricing away as an inhibitor for adoption.

Those prices started at $29.95 for 15GB at 25Mbps/2Mbps, and went up to $139.95 for 200GB at 100Mbps/40Mbps.

Those customers would be notified when the new pricing comes into effect, according to the telco.

Internode is carefully in line with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission's (ACCC's) new cut down on fibre speed advertising, stressing in its new prices that the speeds mentioned were port speeds, and wouldn't be the actual speeds reached in practice.

Some users have already complained of lower speeds than they were expecting on the network, with Internode saying that backhaul problems were causing slow speeds.

It will also be possible to receive an analog phone service once NBN Co makes it available, Internode said.

Mid last year, NBN Co said that the government was developing a solution that enabled legacy voice products to operate over the network.

The analog phone could plug into the network terminating unit via an ATA port, and 150kbps would be allocated for the service, allowing it to be exactly the same as services offered today.

Topics: Broadband, Telcos, NBN

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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30 comments
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  • As many of us thought the target customer will not be able to afford the NBN. The next move will be to make people pay for past the gate service connected or not.
    GBE-71384
    • Here's an analogy for NBN costs. You know all those people buying 50" plasma/LED full-HD TVs? Guess what: they're paying more than they did for their last TV - in some cases, thousands more!

      And do you know why they're willing to pay more? Because what they get is so much better than what they had before. Makes sense, huh?

      At the same time, if you don't want to get the top of the line behemoth TV, there's plenty of smaller sizes - 40", 32", 22". These are less fancy, less amazing; but then they cost a whole lot less too.

      You can pick up a dirt cheap but still watchable smaller TV now for way less than $200. Which is considerably than I paid for my fairly average TV about 10 years ago.

      So: ten years ago, there was a much smaller variety in TVs available, but quite a large number of household sets sold for around $400-500.

      Now there is a wider range available, from the huge, HD wall-sized models right down to the dinky little cheap ones. You can pay as much as you want -- or as little as you want, for a correspondingly wide range in size and picture quality/impressiveness.

      Just like the NBN level of service you want.

      Oh, and another thing: since getting their big wall-sized TVs, many families notice that they spend less out at the movies and other entertainment costs, because they get such a better immersive experience at home now. So it will be with the NBN - most people will dispense with a separate phone line rental as VOIP services become actually reliable and a routine part of the bundle, and there's also a major threat to Foxtel from the Netflix type services - cheaper, less rubbish, more likely to have what you want.

      So when you look at the budget impact by (initially) higher monthly fees - for a MUCH BETTER services - you have to look at the overall budget, including things you will no longer pay for, or will not pay as much.
      Gwyntaglaw
  • This is BS ! Id rather stick to my current optus fusion plan of home phone and unlimited calls to mobiles and STD numbers along with 1000 TB of data for 129 a month ... Its time for Julia to go .. she's sending us back to the dark ages !! I'm so sick of it we were told this NBN would make it cheaper , these prices are ridiculous ! and they still cant guarantee the speeds they are selling .Its time to GO JULIAR !
    scott@...
    • Yep, pack it up everyone. NBN is doomed thanks to Internode. There are no other ISPs that exist in Australia besides Internode... dooooooOOOooooooomed!
      Hubert Cumberdale
    • Does anyone remember what ADSL prices and plans were like when they first came out, years ago? And what they are now? Exactly the same, aren't they?

      What, NOOoooo??? Do you mean that prices don't just stay the same over time? Do you mean that can happen? Really????
      Gwyntaglaw
    • Scott, 1000 tb of data on your fusion plan? I am on a similarly priced fusion plan. Is there something Optus is not telling me about or do you have a nice cosy deal with them. 1000TB of data WOW!
      BoomerMMW
  • This is BS ! Id rather stick to my current optus fusion plan of home phone and unlimited calls to mobiles and STD numbers along with 1000 TB of data for 129 a month ... Its time for Julia to go .. she's sending us back to the dark ages !! I'm so sick of it we were told this NBN would make it cheaper , these prices are ridiculous ! and they still cant guarantee the speeds they are selling .Its time to GO JULIAR !
    scott@...
  • The NBN = National Brodband Network, it's for everybody not just you Scott!

    But if you are gullible enough to believe your fusion plan wouldn't be much higher if it wasn't due to the threat of the NBN (and Otuus and Telstra clamouring to sign up as many as they can to increase their migrations worth - and the others having to follow) then go back before the the NBN was announced and see how much your plan was...!
    Rizz-cd230
    • Still on patrol Fizz trying to sell the dead parrot good to see the public service never sleeps.
      GBE-71384
  • You blokes just get sillier, when we thought that wasn't possible!
    Rizz-cd230
    • Speak for yourself :-) I always knew it was possible. Consider this; you are dealing with people that think anything greater than 5-10mbps upload is "very, very high speeds" and describe it with as much zeal as a crazy man who just discovered a gold nugget in one of his poops.
      Hubert Cumberdale
  • That's Mr Fizz to you idiot...!
    Rizz-cd230
  • At these prices you can count me out. There is no way I will be able to afford the internet and they had better not come to my place to dig any trenches to lay any cables or they'll get what's for.
    aged pensioner
    • You tell 'em, gramps! :)
      Gwyntaglaw
      • Therer are over 3 million "gramps" in this country. They live here, pay for goods and have payed their dues.

        Why shouldn't they be considered? or is because they don't play WoW?
        kaysee-f571a
        • "Why shouldn't they be considered?" Ah, but under the NBN they will be considered just as eligible for fast, reliable broadband as the young 'uns!

          Why do YOU think they shouldn't be considered eligible to benefit in this way? :)
          Gwyntaglaw
  • Keep calm everybody let's wait and see what developes.
    sydneyla
    • Very sensible and sane advice! Grief, is this the internet?
      Gwyntaglaw
  • Australia is one of the most expensive in the western world in relation to internet download charges and speeds are not great either. See article below.
    www.smh.com.au/.../india-beats-australia-and-its-not-just-cricket-20110530.
    georgebb
  • "You cannot be serious?!" - John McEnroe
    ADFSAFSAF