I/O 2013: More than half of apps in Google Play now use Cloud Messaging

I/O 2013: More than half of apps in Google Play now use Cloud Messaging

Summary: Approximately 60 percent of apps in Google Play are said to be now using the service at a rate of 17 billion messages sent per day.

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SAN FRANCISCO -- While it was initially glossed over during the opening keynote session at Google I/O on Wednesday, the Cloud Messaging team offered some more details during a developers session on Thursday.

The cloud-based communications service is touted to enable developers and their services to send data more efficiently to applications on Android devices.

Like the debut of Compute Engine, the Internet first introduced Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) last year.

Since its debut on June 27, 2012, Cloud Messaging has experienced 400 percent growth in 10 months.

Approximately 60 percent of apps in Google Play are said to be now using the service at a rate of 17 billion messages sent per day.

Product team members added yesterday that the average latency rate is now 60 milliseconds.

Francesco Nerieri, head of Android Cloud for Google, outlined some of the GCM upgrades debuting this week on Thursday afternoon at the Moscone West Convention Center.

At the heart of the upgrade for Cloud Messaging is the brand new Cloud Connection Service for communicating with Android devices over an XXMP connection. This is especially important for speeding up the delivering messages back from Android devices to the Google cloud.

Supporting up to 10 connections, this function includes message upstreaming with ACK and NACK protocols while supporting existing Cloud Messaging APIs.

Based on that information and other items that developers want to highlight, GCM now supports multi-device messaging in which developers can a single message to multiple devices owned by the end user.

But ahead of all that, the start process itself has also been revamped to better streamline adding GCM support to Android apps faster.

These changes are available for apps running Froyo (Android 2.2) and higher. Note that upstreaming capabilities are only available on Google Play services.

Topics: Cloud, Collaboration, Enterprise Software, Google, Google Apps

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  • And Google Has More Ways to Sell Your Privacy

    I realize Google is in the business of collecting everything possible about people because there is a lot of money in doing so as they have demonstrated.

    What I am opposed to is their arrogant attitude and inability to be a responsible custodian of this data.

    When their Privacy Statement has to define "Sensitive Personal Data" someone should take notice. They may be overstepping their authority with far reaching implications.

    "This is a particular category of personal information relating to confidential medical facts, racial or ethnic origins, political or religious beliefs or sexuality."

    They explain how this is treated.

    With your consent
    We will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google when we have your consent to do so. We require opt-in consent for the sharing of any sensitive personal information.

    Just last year the policy was they would not share sensitive personal data. Now they are pushing the envelope a little more and sharing it.

    There was a time when they never collect personal data, now they are selling sensitive personal data.

    Now what tactics will they use to acquire the "opt-in consent"?

    Do not miss at the same time they are saying they will sell your personal data with a mere implied consent. Implied consent is merely use of any Google Product or Service.

    But the real threat comes from the legal protection of this sensitive data. The CISPA Bill will reduce Google's liability for releasing this data and they can be all that more careless without the threat of civil litigation hanging over them.

    Are you comfortable with someone like Google holding sensitive data about you, which may not be accurate, but yet can still be used against you in the courts.

    Or if your neighbor is a terrorist and using your wireless router to access the internet. The NSA gets retrieves this information and it points to you being a terrorist and NDAA allows the to ship you off to Egypt to be torchered.

    So Google gaining more ways to collect sensitive data on us may not be a good thing.
    Patrickgood1
  • CISPA Bill?

    You do know that this Bill failed, right?

    Besides, if such a law is passed it will be across the board and will not only apply to Google, it would apply to all service providers.

    Are you sure you are not one of those Microsoft Scroogle Campaign Shills?

    Please explain how Microsoft does this differently than Google...

    http://advertising.microsoft.com/ad-network/audience
    DancesWithTrolls
    • The First Attempt of CISPA Was Killed

      A second go-around for the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) was approved by the Republican-controlled House of Representatives in a bipartisan vote on April 18, 2013 though the White House has again threatened to veto the bill unless more protections for privacy and civil liberties are added.
      Patrickgood1
      • Your forgetting

        That the senate said they won't vote on it (i.e., that means the bill will die).

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/25/cispa-cyber-bill_n_3158221.html

        ZDnet even reported on it.

        http://www.zdnet.com/cispa-dead-in-senate-privacy-concerns-cited-7000014536/

        And even if it does pass that far (very unlikely) a veto would literally kill this bill. The 2/3 majority needed to over rule it would never happen (neither party has enough people to ensure the majority to overrule the veto).
        icyrock
    • MS is Bad Too, This Post is About Google

      So I used Google as the example. I believe google is worse than MS when it comes to "Sensitive Personal Data". Just because MS doe not address it in their Policy, does not mean they are not. It just I cannot be sure.

      I do not use any MS or Google services

      And you are right MS is collecting data too. MS is a bit more vague. But they are doing a lot of the same things as Google

      Google is pushing the envelope. Going after an opt-in consent to disclose SENSITIVE personal information ("medical facts, racial or ethnic origins, political or religious beliefs or sexuality.") to third parties.

      That is copied from Google's Privacy Statement not paraphrased by me. As are the references in the previous post.

      For many years MS has been the reigning Evil Empire, but now that title goes to Google.

      I believe this part of Google differs from MS:
      With your consent
      We will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google when we have your consent to do so. We require opt-in consent for the sharing of any sensitive personal information.

      It's the last sentence that differs for MS.

      Not only that Google has Analytics, DoubleClick, and AdSense to collect more data about the site you visit.

      I use Ad Block Plus to disarm these 3 Google services.

      Then there is YouTube. Google knows too much. Because they are better at collecting and analyzing data than MS, Google can be more dangerous.

      Google Cloud is moving into Analyzing Big Data with their BigQuery Service Their I/O example was Analyzing Shutterfly's 80 petabytes of data.

      Google is storing information about you and you have zero control of how that data is handled. You cannot verify it's accuracy. But it can be used in court against you. With a simple civil subpena. It's up to Google to determine if the subpena is valid. One of CISPA's purpose is to reduce the liability making it easier to get access to data such as Google's.

      Most court cases I have seen where personal data is subpoenaed are directed at Google. Why, because Google is more likely to have more data to use against you.

      Oh yeah and Eric Schmidt's public comment regarding their new Privacy Policy, "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place..."

      We all have things we do not want others to know. It may be just to protect a loved one's feelings. Google does not get that.

      A bit arrogant to be trusted with Sensitive Personal Data.


      Lastly there is this part of their Terms of Service that many do not know: (copied from Google's ToS)

      When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content. The rights you grant in this license are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving our Services, and to develop new ones. This license continues even if you stop using our Services
      Patrickgood1
      • I understand your concern

        I grew up in a Ma Bell family. By that I mean almost all of my Aunts and Uncles, even my Grandfather worked for ATT/Bell all their lives. I was always told not to talk about family business on the phone and never talk about anything confidential on the phone.

        In the field service manuals there were references to tapping devices that were not to be removed if found during field repairs and the proceedure to report them and how the service tech should only report them once even if they were still there several months latter.

        I have been inside data bunkers where huge banks of recording equipment ran 24/7 on all the phone lines for that switch. Saw how many Houston SWB officials and high ranking Houston Police were busted selling corporate data during the mid 1970s.

        Nothing new here....
        DancesWithTrolls
      • Actually Google does better at protecting your data from government request

        "So I used Google as the example. I believe google is worse than MS when it comes to "Sensitive Personal Data". Just because MS doe not address it in their Policy, does not mean they are not. It just I cannot be sure."

        http://gizmodo.com/which-tech-companies-protect-your-data-from-the-governm-486127045
        icyrock
        • Yes They Do OK

          As long as it's not a judges order from a California Court they will usually reject most civil discovery requests.

          But do they reject them to avoid liability? Would they rather not disclose how much they know?

          The Senate says they are not going to on CISPA, but they are drafting their own version. Can only hope they understand constitutional law better then the authors of CISPA.

          Obama said he would veto NDAA too. Then signed it. This is different, there was additional factor in his signing NDAA.

          I expect the Government to keep trying to get easy access Google's data. Google keeps coming up with new ways to gather more and more.

          I do not care for Google's deceptive phrases in their Privacy and ToS docs. When they say We will not disclose your personal data without your consent that is very deceptive. If they have your personal data, then you must have used the service, where use is implied consent. So why do they say they will not disclose without consent, knowing full well consent is implied when they receive the information? I do not trust them.
          Patrickgood1
  • I/O 2013: More than half of apps in Google Play now use Cloud Messaging

    So why is ZDNet showing a graphic with MS Office 365 in the foreground?
    Really, what does that have to do with the article?
    DancesWithTrolls
  • Is the data of most people so secret?!

    I'm not afraid of my sexuality, race or religion orientation. I'm not a criminal and while I don't want my personal emails to be available for anyone to see, I have limited issue if an investigation unit needs too search in my personal data - it's their job.
    If some people are real afraid, they should not use 3rd party cloud services, without some sort of encryption. And they should stay away from Google, amazon, Microsoft, or whatever.
    I want the bad guys to go to prison - the hell with their privacy. I will not plan my next bank assault using gmail for sure :-)
    This is the era of facebook, where many (they're a loot) publish their entire personal life - from outbursts about their bosses to pictures about the last time they were drunk.
    I admit it's quite scary what Google knows about you. When an important chunk of world's pulsation has an android, Google easily knows where you live, how many times you entered that shop, where do you go to work, with whom you have meetings, that you are thinking about buying a new slr camera, ... More than the personal privacy, they can gain an unfair advantage (per example) from a business point of view.
    AleMartin