Kudos to Fujitsu Technical Support

Kudos to Fujitsu Technical Support

Summary: I mentioned earlier today that I was not able to get a Wireless-N connection between my Lifebook S6510 and Linksys WRT350N router. I have just been on Fujitsu live support chat, and I believe the problem is now solved.

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TOPICS: Linux
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I mentioned earlier today that I was not able to get a Wireless-N connection between my Lifebook S6510 and Linksys WRT350N router. I have just been on Fujitsu live support chat, and I believe the problem is now solved. It seems that in order to get a wireless connection above 54 Mbps, you must be using WPA2-Personal security, and I was only using basic WPA security. I haven't actually tested this yet, as there are several other computers and devices that connect to the router which I will have to change at the same time. But it makes sense that something like this would be the problem, since the connection itself was working just fine, and the signal strength was excellent, it just wouldn't even try to go above 54 Mbps.

While I had the support specialist on the line, I asked the question again about disabling tapping on the touchpad. Yes, I had already figured this out, but since I had previously been told by Fujitsu support that it was not possible, my intention was to tell this support specialist what I had found, so they could use that information in the future. Much to my surprise, before I could do that she came back with a solution that is even better (easier) than what I had found! If you have the Synaptics touchpad icon in the system tray, you simply have to right-click on it, and "Tap to Click" is one of the options.

So, kudos to Fujitsu Technical Support, and "Wanda" in particular. This is the way support should work, at its best. I originally changed from Toshiba to Fujitsu laptops primarily because Toshiba support was hopeless, and I have commented many times, in many places, about how ridiculously incompetent Skype support is. It's nice to deal with a good support organization for a change.

jw 3/1/2008

Topic: Linux

J.A. Watson

About J.A. Watson

I started working with what we called "analog computers" in aircraft maintenance with the United States Air Force in 1970. After finishing military service and returning to university, I was introduced to microprocessors and machine language programming on Intel 4040 processors. After that I also worked on, operated and programmed Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-8, PDP-11 (/45 and /70) and VAX minicomputers. I was involved with the first wave of Unix-based microcomputers, in the early '80s. I have been working in software development, operation, installation and support since then.

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