Learn Windows Azure free on December 13

Learn Windows Azure free on December 13

Summary: Microsoft is holding a one-day "Learn Windows Azure" conference on its campus in Redmond on December 13. However, the day's events will also be webcast on Microsoft's Channel 9 for those who can't make it to Seattle.

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Microsoft is holding a one-day "Learn Windows Azure" conference on its campus in Redmond on December 13. However, the day's events will also be webcast on Microsoft's Channel 9 for those who can't make it to Seattle. Videos of the talks will also be available later.

The Learn Windows Azure conference will run from 9am to 5pm PST on Tuesday. The event will start with a 90-minute introduction from Microsoft corporate vice president and blogger Scott Guthrie (formerly of Silverlight fame). It will close with an hour-long Expert Panel Q&A featuring Scott Guthrie, Dave Campbell, and Mark Russinovich. Observers will be able to ask questions on Twitter using the #WindowsAzure hashtag.

Windows Azure also has a new website with links to the SDK and a 3-month free trial. A single-core entry-level system costs about £30 per month.

Azure is also available from other suppliers, and Fujitsu has just announced that it will offer Hybrid Cloud Services for Microsoft Windows Azure in the UK, USA, Australia, Canada and Spain, based on the Fujitsu Global Cloud platform in Japan. One of the selling points is that customers can hold data at one of their own locations or in the country they choose. Some organisations and government departments are wary about US-owned cloud services, where their data may be accessed by the US government under the Patriot Act.

Azure currently uses six data centres. Two of those are in the USA (Chicago and San Antonio), two in Asia (Hong Kong and Singapore), and two in Europe (Amsterdam and Dublin).

@jackschofield

Topic: Tech Industry

Jack Schofield

About Jack Schofield

Jack Schofield spent the 1970s editing photography magazines before becoming editor of an early UK computer magazine, Practical Computing. In 1983, he started writing a weekly computer column for the Guardian, and joined the staff to launch the newspaper's weekly computer supplement in 1985. This section launched the Guardian’s first website and, in 2001, its first real blog. When the printed section was dropped after 25 years and a couple of reincarnations, he felt it was a time for a change....

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