Lenovo: Have your Windows 8 cake and run your Android apps too

Lenovo: Have your Windows 8 cake and run your Android apps too

Summary: Lenovo is joining forces with Bluestacks to bring Android apps to some of its Windows 8 PCs.

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Want some Android apps. with your Windows 8 PC? Lenovo and Bluestacks can give you that.

Las Vegas -- Lenovo may be Microsoft's Windows 8 go-to partner, but the company is not picking sides. Lenovo is also partnering with Bluestacks to run Android apps on some of its Windows 8 PCs.

Bluestacks announced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) that Lenovo will preload its Android App Player software and service on Lenovo’s Idea-branded consumer PCs. BlueStacks is also showcasing at the show its latest version of the App Player which is designed and optimized for Windows 8 Ultrabooks, laptops, and tablets.

Bluestacks doesn't use a virtual machine (VM) or Android to run Android apps on Windows or on other operating systems such as Mac OS X. Instead, Bluestacks runs an emulation of the Android Davlik JVM (Java Virtual Machine) on top of Windows.

While BlueStacks plans to patent some of the technology in its Android emulator, LayerCake, this emulation technique dates back for decades. The most well-known of these operating system emulators is Wine. This popular open-source program, along with its commercial brother CodeWeavers CrossOver, enables users of Linux, Mac OS X, and other Unix OSs to run Windows applications. It does this by bridging the gap between the Windows program's application programming interface (API) calls and the underlying operating system.

In a statement, Lenovo’s VP of worldwide marketing said, "Innovation is vital to leading in the PC world, and we're winning by continuing to push the limits in both software and hardware. Our alliance with BlueStacks puts us in a unique position to offer the most popular games and apps on flagship PC products like the Horizon Table PC in order to give our customers engaging user experiences."

Rosen Sharma, President and CEO of BlueStacks, who's seen his company make similar partnerships with other vendors such as AMD and Asus is, as you might imagine, pleased with the deal.

Sharma said, “As the PC market leader and a growing smartphone maker in China, it’s huge that Lenovo is implementing our vision of creating a blended experience across smartphones, tablets, and PCs. Consumers really want access to all their apps across all devices. Artificial barriers and silo-ed ecosystems have long been a source of confusion and frustration. The digital world is a celebration of heterogeneous devices. My PC, tablet, smartphone, and TV may or may not be from the same brand, but that does not mean that my apps should not work across both devices."

It also speaks to the growing popularity of Android that Lenovo, as staunch a Windows 8 supporter as Microsoft has, is incorporating Android app compatibility into its consumer line of Windows devices.

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Topics: Android, Laptops, Lenovo, Microsoft, CES, PCs, Windows 8

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34 comments
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  • Wow, did you just admit that Windows 8 was sweet?

    "Have your Windows 8 cake"

    I agree, Windows 8 is sweet.

    Kudos to Lenovo, Bluestacks, and Microsoft. This makes Windows 8 even better.
    toddbottom3
    • I don't think he did

      But kudos to Lenovo for adding the Android compatibility layer MS didn't.
      John L. Ries
      • Why Windows 8 really is pretty great

        Not Windows 8 per se, but running a "full" OS on your slate...because it is a full OS, this kind of stuff is possible.
        x I'm tc
  • Thanks, but no thanks.

    Nothing can match the usefulness, beauty and smoothness of Windows 8 store apps. The app count is approaching 50,000 in just two months time. Windows users don't need any more Google products or malware.

    Remember the explanation from Google that the Google maps not working in WP phones?. Liars, Google is banned from my house since 2008.
    Owlll1net
    • We are totally Google Free (as we can be!) too.

      Our home is also Google free. I guess we can't stop from crossing Google owned internet properties or servers but outside of that we don't purposely install nor run anything Google.
      They have zero respect for the end user. Microsoft seems like a cub scout compared to the monster that is Google. Android apps look like crapware from OEMs or worse and function similarly.
      xuniL_z
      • Apple Siri

        Don't forget about Apple Siri.
        lares3k
      • Paging Mike Cox

        You've been too scarce of late, which is allowing Pro-MS posts to start looking like yours.

        Mike was actually typing about his anti-Google firewall several years ago when MS first launched it's "beat Google" campaign, but it looks like the joke is starting to become reality.
        John L. Ries
  • SWEET!

    no more need to dual boot Linux onto a Windows machine - just run 'Bluestacks' - unless of course, Android isn't Linux?

    no more need to break down the 'EUFI' door

    no more wasted hours compiling, after all, compiling doesn't really make you smarter - it just makes you late for diner.

    Welcome To The World Of Choices!
    Mujibahr
    • Bluetacks is not Linux

      Bluetacks is just running java. It does not use the Linux kernel at all.
      frank0-3f91e
      • You're Right!

        I read this:

        "Bluestacks doesn't use a virtual machine (VM) or Android to run Android apps on Windows or on other operating systems such as Mac OS X. Instead, Bluestacks runs an emulation of the Android Davlik JVM (Java Virtual Machine) on top of Windows."

        I got it!

        What I am saying is that if Android is Linux, then Bluestacks should be adaptable to any other form of Linux.
        Mujibahr
        • It's not that simple

          Android apps are apps that run via the Dalvik VM. The way a VM works is that if you can make a VM for another OS you do not need any code from another OS that also runs its own version of the VM. Native Linux apps will still not run on a VM without Linux also running on the VM, unless they were programmed with a multi-environment language in which case you could recompile it if you had the source code.
          Michael Kelly
          • So let me see if I've got this straight?

            Android is Linux except when it's not Linux; however, one can recompile Linux to become Android which would still be Linux except that it's Android?
            Mujibahr
          • you did not

            You need to be a programer to do...
            orendon
          • Android apps are Java apps

            This makes for better portability. In theory, X clients compiled for Linux could also run under Android if an X server was installed (I don't know if there is one for Android). Plain old console Linux execs compiled for ARM will also run in a terminal app.

            But the fact that Android apps are written in Java for the Dalvik VM means they'll run on any Dalvik VM, regardless of the host OS.
            John L. Ries
  • Checkmate

    If you want to gain marketshare, play nice with other platforms. This bucks the trend of other players who are blocking competition and will help drive Windows 8 sales (mobile and desktop).

    Bluestacks should be on the list of possible acquisitions by Microsoft. I think the technology should be packaged as part of the OS. One of the biggest obstacles to Android owners to adopting Windows Phone 8 is "I don't want to lose all my Android apps". This technology overcomes that objection, so it seems.
    relawson1
  • Lets not read too much into it

    "It also speaks to the growing popularity of Android that Lenovo, as staunch a Windows 8 supporter as Microsoft has, is incorporating Android app compatibility into its consumer line of Windows devices."

    I guess it speaks to the growing popularity of Norton AV or Roxio since is was installed on so many PC's right from the factory.

    I mean it's great that it's there if you're into it, but then aren't we getting into the issue of so much crapware people don't want coming installed on their PC's?

    Why is it suddenly good to him all of a sudden?
    William Farrel
    • Your question is rhetorical...

      Of course. :)
      xuniL_z
  • Lenovo: Have your Windows 8 cake and run your Android apps too

    No thanks, I moved to Microsoft Windows 8 to get away from malware.
    Loverock-Davidson
    • Interesting

      “I moved to Microsoft Windows 8 to get away from malware.”

      So Windows 8 can not get malware?
      daikon
      • Malware on Linux 8

        You're not seriously expecting the Black Hatters to use Windows 8, are you?
        jochenw