Lenovo takes on the iPad with Windows 8-powered ThinkPad Tablet 2

Lenovo takes on the iPad with Windows 8-powered ThinkPad Tablet 2

Summary: The biggest advantage to the enterprise? It runs Windows.

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A leaked marketing document from hardware OEM Lenovo shows how the company is serious about taking on Apple and its incumbent tablet, the iPad.

In an attempt to differentiate its ThinkPad Tablet 2 from the competition, the company has drawn up a marketing document -- leaked to The Verge -- highlighting the differences between its tablet, other random Windows 8 tablets, and the iPad.

The bottom line of the highlights is that Lenovo's tablet runs Windows while the iPad do not.

The tablet will also be powered by a dual-core Intel Clover Trail processor, and will be kitted out with 2GB RAM, 64GB storage, and feature a 10.1-inch WXGA display.

While it's obvious that the iPad isn't going to be able to handle some of the checkbox feature -- PC apps and Windows 7 tools to manage devices are never going to make it to the iPad -- it's clear that Lenovo is positioning the ThinkPad Tablet 2 as the ideal device for enterprise over Apple's offering. Encryption for external storage and multiple user logins are features that will appeal to enterprise users.

Combined with optional pen for input and a rather smart looking keyboard, the ThinkPad Tablet 2 looks like it might have real potential. RAID mirroring for a tablet seems like clutching at straws, and comes across as little more than a way to get a full ten checkpoints up on the iPad.

Interestingly, Lenovo avoids any battery comparisons.

While any tablet is ultimately a tradeoff device when compared to a desktop or notebook, by running Windows and offering a keyboard Lenovo hopes that its ThinkPad Tablet 2 will be seen as less of a compromise.

Given that Windows-powered tablets have existed for over a decade and they all failed to make even a modest impact on the market, Lenovo's enthusiasm may be a little misplaced.

There's no word on pricing or a release date, but the appearance of certification documents on the FCC website means that this should be out around the same time as Windows 8 is launched on October 26th.

Image source: The Verge.

Topics: Tablets, Hardware, Lenovo, Windows

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95 comments
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  • Really?

    "Given that Windows-powered tablets have existed for over a decade and they all failed to make even a modest impact on the market, Lenovo's enthusiasm may be a little misplaced."

    That's like comparing WM6 to WP7. Bit of a stretch, don't you think?
    clue88
    • Yes buddy...really!

      Windows 8 is going to make a huge impact in the Tablet market. It's faster, sexier and supports more of the everyday tools most users and companies need to be successful.
      Rob.sharp
      • did Windows 7 tablets not support the same tools as Windows 7 desktops?

        Given that there have been Windows tablets for at least 10 years, and those tablets ran the same version of Windows as contemporaneous desktops and laptops, but they didn't sell well, it's not unreasonable to question why it wouldn't be the same this time for W8.

        There's also the huge and as yet unanswered question: do people want to do the same things on tablets and desktops? If so, odd that previous Windows tablets failed so badly. If not, not at all clear W8 tablets would succeed.

        So the question is: does the typical tablet user want to run Excel or Angry Birds on his/her tablet? The secondary question for workplace use: does the typical traveling employee want to run Excel with keyboard and mouse or using touch?

        I don't doubt there's a lot of people who'd like hybrids/tablets w/wireless keyboards. To early to tell how well those work out compared to traditional laptops. OTOH, I can't see much if any home market for x86/x64 Windows tablets. As for ARM Windows RT tablets, consider the number of Metro apps vs iOS apps. Or are all those Windows RT buyers just dying to run Office for ARM via touch?
        hrlngrv 
        • Day 1 vs Day 365

          "As for ARM Windows RT tablets, consider the number of Metro apps vs iOS apps"

          Since metro apps will run in both Windows 8 (soon to be installed on 100s of millions of PCs) and on WinRT tablets, developers have a lot of incentive to close that gap very quickly. WP7 didn't even have that advantage and it very quickly grew a respectable application library. Was it as big as iOS? No but I have 30 apps installed on my iPad, I don't need millions. 100,000 is just as good for me.
          toddbottom3
          • Windows 8 on 100s of Millions of PC ?!?

            I think I heard the same thing said right before Vista was launched....then crashed and burned.

            A program that runs on a keyboard/mouse system is no fun to use on a screen/finger system. The interfaces must be designed for each and MS still does not seem to get this. It is one thing to run on both system and another to be useful on both systems.
            KBabcock75
          • I am always amused when I think of the funeral procession

            The one where MS employees paraded a coffin through town to celebrate the death of all other OSes as a result of Windows Phone 7. It was ironic given how WP7 might be suggesteds to have itself died!
            Wakemewhentrollsgone
          • Especially as

            Said Microsoft employees (probably/certainly) knew that WP7 was toast and WP8 was "the future" before WP7 was even released.
            ego.sum.stig
          • The Vista lie

            Yes Vista was completely hopeless, the world stopped using Windows and MS went bankrupt - oh wait, wrong parallel universe. In fact Vista had a few problems out of the box, mainly the crapware/hardware from OEMS and SP1 fixed the rest.

            What so many people don't understand is mouse/kb/touch/gesture don't have to be exclusive. Sometimes I might use the mouse ofr kb, sometimes I'll touch the screen and sometimes I'll use gestures, all in the space of a few minutes. Win 8 is designed for all platforms and doesn't require one exclusive interface method.

            I'm still amazed that people insist on defending their grids of tiny dead icons - perhaps because they don't know any better ;-)
            Tony_McS
          • Or pherpas it is you who does not understand . . .

            "I'm still amazed that people insist on defending their grids of tiny dead icons - perhaps because they don't know any better ;-)"

            . . . that not everyone works like you and has your needs. Those rows of dead pixles might not suit you, and so don't buy a device with those, but clearly those suit many millions of others ;-)
            Wakemewhentrollsgone
          • Dead pixels...

            "but clearly those suit many millions of others"

            So you have a market research where people who never used any smartphone or tablet computer has seen a full running Windows 8 tablet compared to a iPad and in this marketing research it shows that a majority will choose dead pixel versus live tiles? :-)

            Matter of fact, I use WP7 and almost all iPhone users who se my live tiles rotate on the front screen and show me live updates gets impressed. I'll argue that given a fair comparison the majority would choose a live tile system over apples dead pixel system every time. The only problem is that people don't even know that there is an alternative to dead pixels. Hopefully that will change when stores puts up Windows tablets and display them next to iPads. That will be interesting...
            brhorv
          • Grids of icons

            Just like Windows 95 had and no one complained. Of course, no one jumped for joy either.
            AudeKhatru
          • @Tony_McS How's that WP7 Metro UI working out in the market?

            "I'm still amazed that people insist on defending their grids of tiny dead icons - perhaps because they don't know any better ;-)"

            So how has that "phone to save us from our phone" worked out?
            dave95.
          • There is a certain irony . . .

            There seems a certain irony in the fact that Windows 8 looks like Windows Phone 7.

            WP7 was going to beat all other OSes, so much so that the MS developers paraded a coffin down the street to symbolise the death of other mobile phone OSes. Ironically, it is WP7 that seems to have died. It might or might not be a very good OS, but that is somewhat beside the point because, on any standard, WP7 phones have not sold very well. It hard to suggest that WP7 has been anything other than a failure. Yet, knowing that, MS has now developed a full desktop and mobile OS that reflects WP7. I understand that MS spends a "fortune" on product development and testing and on the basis it would seem that the decision of MS to follow W8 along the path of WP7 is well founded; yet, the poor sales of WP7 would suggest otherwise.

            In the next few months, just about every PC sold will have W8 on it and, perhaps, that will be enough to convince many that it is a good OS with a useful paradigm. But I am still left to wonder . . .
            Wakemewhentrollsgone
          • Awsome post Tony

            I just don't get what the big f'n deal is with the ipad. It's the same endless grid of stagnant icons; basically an over-sized iphone. With Windows 8 at least Microsoft is trying different things and new concepts instead of the same boring UI found in apple products. I thought apple was supposed to be the innovative company, but it looks like Microsoft has that title now.
            SteveWojo
          • Don't get it Steve?

            Then you are doomed. Putting a desktop OS on a tablet is like putting a Detroit Diesel engine in a bicycle.
            CowLauncher
          • Way Way Way off.

            Its more like putting a small engine in a bicycle. Its called a motorcycle and it can take you a lot of places a bicycle will not, and can do it all a lot faster.

            Case closed.
            Cayble
          • Tony

            "I'm still amazed that people insist on defending their grids of tiny dead icons - perhaps because they don't know any better ;-)"

            Well, if you are going to do something differently it is a good idea to make sure it is an improvement and not just being different to be different. Grids of tiny dead icons is pretty damed efficient. Icons that go overboard with what they are trying to be may just be annoying.
            CowLauncher
          • 400 million

            At the release of Windows 7, Windows Vista had 400 million internet users.

            So, Windows Vista actually did okay. For Apple, 400 million of anything is a huge success, but with Microsoft 400 million is crashing and burning.
            AudeKhatru
          • no doubt

            Metro apps on desktop PCs will be as popular as Windows Phone 7 has proven to be. If I were an ISV needing to make a living, writing for Metro wouldn't be my first choice. Desktop software will continue to rule the Windows software world for years to come. Metro is likely to prove as fertile as Mac Hypercard of yore. (It's new! It's cool! It's USELESS!)
            hrlngrv 
          • Face it

            Your religious leaders screwed the pooch, again. But that will mean gainful employment for you, for several years. Spreading the lies of your master, That fat ugly Bald pig, must fill you with such emotional joy.
            Jumpin Jack Flash