LG may be launching a Nexus with limited storage and integrated battery

LG may be launching a Nexus with limited storage and integrated battery

Summary: Rumors continue to swirl around the possible next Google Nexus smartphone and the latest information has LG launching one in mid-November.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Android, Google
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I have a GSM Samsung Galaxy Nexus that I use on T-Mobile and AT&T and am a fan of the pure Google experience, especially with Jelly Bean loaded on the device. My friend Paul O'Brien just posted some details on a rumored LG Nexus that may be release in mid-November. I would like to see LG take a shot at a Nexus, given that HTC and Samsung tried it before. However, a couple of the specs are a bit disappointing for a Nexus device.

Paul didn't post any blurry photos or anything, but he did list the specifications that he states are confirmed. They are typical for current Android devices, but the lack of microSD, limit of 16GB storage, and non-removable battery are not going to please Nexus fans. The one specification unique to Android is integrated wireless charging but that is a nice to have and not an essential.

Google has not said if there will be a Nexus announcement yet and there are rumors that we may see multiple Nexus devices from different manufacturers. We'll just have to wait and see how things shake out, but stay tuned to Paul's post for further updates.

Topics: Mobility, Android, Google

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9 comments
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  • Unfortunately

    Nobody wants to pay the MS ExFat tax so some skip the SD Card altogether!
    slickjim
    • is that why OEMs skip the SD card reader?

      I thought any phone that can pair via USB mass storage to a windows machine typically used ExFat, so all android phones had to do this regardless
      theoilman
      • Re: I thought any phone that can pair via USB mass storage to a windows mac

        That's why newer Android devices can connect to a PC via MTP. That way, it's none of the PC's business what filesystem the device is using.
        ldo17
  • Non-removable battery?

    Total deal killer for two reasons.

    Battery is the first ting to die, but more importantly, unless the system software has improved greatly, how you going to restart it once it locks up?

    My wife's Android phone locks up to where you need to remove and replace the battery to get it to do anything again -- happens a couple of times a year :(
    wally_333
    • Especially if the Nexus is still targeted towards developers

      In the beginning, the Nexus devices were really intended for developers to get the latest and greatest version of the OS to test out and without a removable battery I don't see how that is helpful when test software locks up, etc. Google needs to control what is considered a Nexus and not give Sprint or Verizon one anymore either. Stick with GSM, removable battery, etc.
      palmsolo (aka Matthew Miller)
      • Re: when test software locks up, etc.

        Android is Linux. Even if a process is stuck in a loop, you can still get in via a shell prompt to kill it. Or as a last resort, just hold the power button down and reboot the device.
        ldo17
    • The same way it's done on iPhone

      When a manufacturer builds a device with a built in batter they account for that in hardware. They'll include method to completely cut the device power and bring it back. This isn't new technology.
      brother451
      • Gee, a power switch that actually turns off the power!

        Gee, a power switch that actually turns off the power! What a concept. Too bad they are missing from most phones.

        Did Apple patent it :)

        A reset switch could work too.

        Doesn't change the fact that the battery is the least reliable thing in the phone.
        wally_333
  • Forecast: cloudy

    I understand that everything is moving to the cloud and all? But until super-cheap, high-speed wireless connectivity is ubiquitous (and I mean, literally *everywhere*) 16Gb of offline storage just isn't going to cut it.

    And if you absolutely have to avoid ExFat royalties, then have your microSD card slot use another filesystem and provide provide a driver so I can copy my music and movies over to the card's native filesystem. I don't care about the filesystem, as long as I can drag 16.1 Gb of music onto it.
    dsf3g