LinkedIn hit by outage from 'DNS issue'

LinkedIn hit by outage from 'DNS issue'

Summary: [UPDATE] Business social network says it is recovering from a DNS issue, which has taken the Web site offline for at least over the past three hours.

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[UPDATE] LinkedIn is suffering an outage after being hit by a "DNS issue", causing its Web site to be offline for at least half a day. The company says the fault was not caused by hackers but by an error on the part of its domain service provider, confirming previous suggestions it was human error. 

In an e-mail sent to ZDNet Asia on Friday, a day after the site outage, a company spokesperson said "linkedin.com" was not accessible to a majority of its members due to an error by the company that manages LinkedIn's domain name.

"[It's] not due to malicious activity of any kind. Our team was able to quickly address the issue, and our site has returned to normal. We believe that at no point was any LinkedIn member data compromised in any way," the company said. 

The business social network went down early Thursday morning  when the site was inaccessible for at least half a day. In a tweet on Thursday at 9.43am Singapore time, LinkedIn said then without elaborating on details: "Our site is now recovering for some members. We determined it was a DNS issue, we're continuing to work on it. Thanks for your patience."

App.net's co-founder Bryan Berg had suggested the service was "hijacked" and due to the lack of SSL security on the site, it meant if a user visited the page, "[his] browser sent [his] long-lived session cookies in plain text", potentially enabling third-parties to access user information and accounts.

A user on Hacker News claiming to work with LinkedIn network operations center, however, pointed out the outage was due to a mistake from the social network's DNS provider, which accidentally pointed the Web site's homepage to a domain parking page, stating the LinkedIn.com domain was up for sale.

linkedin
Some users were greeting with a domain sale page when trying to access LinkedIn's homepage. (Source: The Next Web)

Twitter users are still saying they cannot access LinkedIn.com, but none report seeing the domain sale page.

The DNS issue comes a year after 6.5 million passwords were leaked from LinkedIn and uploaded to a Russian hacker server.

When approached by ZDNet Asia, LinkedIn then said: "[We are] experiencing some intermittent issues due to a DNS issue. Our team is working on it right now and we hope to have the issues resolved as soon as possible."

Topics: Outage, Security, Social Enterprise

Ellyne Phneah

About Ellyne Phneah

Elly grew up on the adrenaline of crime fiction and it spurred her interest in cybercrime, privacy and the terror on the dark side of IT. At ZDNet Asia, she has made it her mission to warn readers of upcoming security threats, while also covering other tech issues.

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2 comments
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  • Go, go, incompetence

    No DNSSEC in a "major" online business? This is a ticking bomb and a disaster waiting to happen.

    It is amazing how pathetic all those "Big Internet companies" are when it comes to securing their own operation and the trust of users. No DNSSEC, no SSL (preferably DANE based)...

    Most even don't employ sufficient SPAM controls, such as hard SPF rules.
    danbi
    • DNSSEC

      Have you ever tried running Microsoft DNS server with DNSSEC turned on? Which is by default in Windows 2008R2. If you have a lot of DNS traffic you must disable DNSSEC (as well as EDNSProbes) or your DNS requests will start returning unknown errors after a couple of days. I've reported it to Microsoft, but they haven't fixed it yet/ever.
      brian@...