Linux.conf.au 2012: FreedomBox's privacy

Linux.conf.au 2012: FreedomBox's privacy

Summary: Open software isn't just a programming- and software-licensing methodology; it's also a political philosophy and a revolutionary movement — something made clear by Linux projects like FreedomBox.

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Open software isn't just a programming- and software-licensing methodology; it's also a political philosophy and a revolutionary movement — something made clear by Linux projects like FreedomBox.

Bdale Garbee
(Credit: Stilgherrian/ZDNet Australia)

FreedomBox is a personal server running a free software operating system and free applications. The project aims to create and preserve personal privacy by providing a secure platform for building federated social networks.

Instead of storing personal information centrally in commercial services, like Facebook or Google+, every user would have their own FreedomBox server, minimising the possibility of their data being accessed by third parties legally or illegally.

Yes, we're talking about things like the open social networks Diaspora and BuddyCloud.

In this second of four daily podcasts from the Linux.conf.au 2012 (LCA) conference in Ballarat, you'll hear FreedomBox Foundation board member and developer Bdale Garbee explain how and why FreedomBox is based on Debian Linux, and explain the hardware that they're working with.

You'll also hear about Red Hat's experimental platform as a service (PaaS) product OpenShift from its evangelist and open-source advocate Mark Atwood, and exactly what happened to that Linux-equipped balloon launched by Project Horus that we mentioned yesterday.

Running time: 29 minutes, 23 seconds

"Metal Free Software Song 2: This Time It's Personal" by Jono Bacon is based on the original "Free Software Song" by Richard Stallman, used under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike licence.

Topics: Open Source, Privacy, Security, Social Enterprise

About

Stilgherrian is a freelance journalist, commentator and podcaster interested in big-picture internet issues, especially security, cybercrime and hoovering up bulldust.

He studied computing science and linguistics before a wide-ranging media career and a stint at running an IT business. He can write iptables firewall rules, set a rabbit trap, clear a jam in an IBM model 026 card punch and mix a mean whiskey sour.

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