Linux.conf.au 2012 venue announced

Linux.conf.au 2012 venue announced

Summary: After the wildly successful Linux.conf.au 2011 attracted over 650 attendees to Brisbane, the location has been announced for next year's open source conference.

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The location has been announced for next year's Linux.conf.au conference.

Linux.conf.au 2012 is set to be held at Ballarat University in Victoria, an institution that launched its bid to host the conference in July last year.

Conference project director Josh Stewart told ZDNet Australia today that the event is set to be held at the university from 16 January 2012.

"We're really excited that we can take the conference out of the capital cities of Australia and bring it to somewhere it hasn't been before," Stewart said. The university is approximately 120 kilometres from the Melbourne central business district.

Stewart — a business development manager for IBM — added that he already had a core team of organisers assembled numbering eight people.

"Post this conference, job one will be sitting down with organisers and hammering things out," he added.

Open-source advocate Jeff Waugh said that he was pleased with the decision to host the conference in Ballarat.

Waugh said that this year's Brisbane-based conference had been great, and that the Queensland flood crisis had done little to dampen the spirits of attendees.

Linux.conf.au held a benefit dinner held last night with all proceeds going towards the Queensland Premier's flood appeal.

The benefit raised over $23,000 towards the flood recovery efforts, with more donated over the final day of the conference. Festivities at the benefit included an open-source trivia challenge. Open-source guru Linus Torvalds attended the benefit dinner, but despite his celebrated status in the open source world, his team was unable to secure the top spot in the contest.

Keynote speakers at Linux.conf.au 2011 included co-founder of the internet, Vinton Cerf and futurist and open-source developer Mark Pesce, who said that developers and users need to arm themselves with privacy-centric software in order to combat exploitation by companies like Facebook and Google.

Topics: Open Source, Government AU, Privacy, Security

Luke Hopewell

About Luke Hopewell

A fresh recruit onto the tech journalism battlefield, Luke Hopewell is eager to see some action. After a tour of duty in the belly of the Telstra beast, he is keen to report big stories on the enterprise beat. Drawing on past experience in radio, print and magazine, he plans to ask all the tough questions you want answered.

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