Malone vs. Gane on copyright reform

Malone vs. Gane on copyright reform

Summary: Unsurprisingly, the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft's loss at the High Court will see internet service providers less open to compromise solutions on how to fight piracy, which means free rein for infringers.

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Unsurprisingly, the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft's (AFACT) loss at the High Court will see internet service providers (ISPs) less open to compromise solutions on how to fight piracy, which means free rein for infringers.

As you'll hear in this episode of Twisted Wire, there have been a few key sticking points between the telco industry and copyright owners on how to tackle possible infringements. One of them is the cost.

Michael Malone, CEO of iiNet, says that there now needs to be a business case to demonstrate why they should be helping to stop infringements. Timothy Webb, a senior associate at law firm Clayton Utz, points to New Zealand, where copyright owners pay for each intellectual property match and infringement notice, whilst Neil Gane, managing director of AFACT, wants us to look to the US for the answer.

What do you think? We'll look at overseas models in the near future on Twisted Wire, so leave a message on (02) 9304 5198 to have your views included in the program.

Running time: 32 minutes, 37 seconds

Topics: Legal, Government AU, Piracy, Security, Telcos

About

Phil Dobbie has a wealth of radio and business experience. He started his career in commercial radio in the UK and, since coming to Australia in 1991, has held senior marketing and management roles with Telstra, OzEmail, the British Tourist Authority and other telecommunications, media, travel and advertising businesses.

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Talkback

4 comments
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  • While recognising the need for a snappy intro to articles, it's a bit much to say that the iiNet decision 'means free rein for infringers.'

    That's the sort of language we might expect from afart, but not from a post on a knowledgable tech site.
    anonymousI
  • Afar or Afart? I'm not sure I want to know. Sorry if it's a bridge too far, but if you listen to the podcast you'll find a more balanced approach. But, if the ISPs stop issuing infringement notices it's close to free rein isn't it? The pressure is on the copyright owners to arrive at a solution that all parties are happy with - or get the law changed.
    phildobbie
  • The whole issue is based on the embrace by all involved (except the public of course) of the 'problem' of piracy. Statistics (apart from the fantasy figures of gane and his bosses) point to the 'problem' as being a snake oil construct.
    btone-c5d11
  • Very entertaining podcast. A simple solution for the entertainment industry for making content available would be to remove the artificial walls between content like Hulu and Netflix. Get rid of the IP Geo blocks and the US only payment system then sit back and watch the services explode.
    rufuslives