Mapping identity fraud's impact on the UK

Mapping identity fraud's impact on the UK

Summary: As digital methods become increasingly used for identity crime, there are fewer low-risk areas for the fraud in the UK, according to a report from Cifas

SHARE:
TOPICS: Security
1

 |  Image 1 of 5

  • Incidents of identity fraud grew by almost 10 percent in the first nine months of 2010, compared with the same period in the previous year, according to a report from Cifas, a UK industry group focusing on fraud prevention. At the same time, the number of people who had their identity stolen by criminals rose by about 18 percent, to 70,000 victims.

    Those figures reflect the increasing impact of e-crime, Cifas said in its Digital Thieves report (PDF), released on 15 October as part of its National Identity Fraud Prevention Week. It argues that criminals who use phishing and malware to steal personal details end up with a random spread of victims. This contrasts with more traditional identity thieves, who are more likely to have targeted their victims, the report's authors said.

    This map from the report shows where in the UK people are more likely to suffer identity fraud arising from e-crime, adjusted for population. Red is highest risk, with dark green representing the lowest risk. The map shows a range of distribution and risk across the country.

    Credit: Map courtesy of Cifas and copyright holders the Ordnance Survey, Royal Mail and Office for National Statistics.

  • This map from Cifas describes the distribution of risk for traditional identity theft not linked to digital methods across the UK. This map shows far more 'safe' areas than the e-crime map.

    Credit: Map courtesy of Cifas and copyright holders the Ordnance Survey, Royal Mail and Office for National Statistics.

  • Thumbnail 1
  • Thumbnail 2
  • Thumbnail 3
  • Thumbnail 4
  • Thumbnail 5

Topic: Security

Karen Friar

About Karen Friar

Karen Friar is news editor for ZDNet in the UK, based in London. She started out in film journalism in San Francisco, before making the switch to tech coverage at ZDNet.com. Next came a move to CNET News.com, where she looked after west coast coverage of business technology, and finally a return to her homeland with ZDNet UK.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

1 comment
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • One assumes that if you were to overlay a map of broadband penetration on top of that the dark green areas would match up with those places with the least connectivity.
    walsingham