McAfee: We can compete with Microsoft

McAfee: We can compete with Microsoft

Summary: With Microsoft's OneCare security service launching soon, McAfee vows it will be able to compete. Others aren't so sure

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TOPICS: Security
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Antivirus company McAfee has vowed it can compete with OneCare, Microsoft's upcoming security package for home users.

McAfee said on Tuesday it will respond to the arrival of Microsoft in its market by pushing into new areas beyond the computer — although it is adamant that it can coexist with Microsoft in the PC space.

"We are confident that we have the right strategies in place and that we can scale our model as more opportunities arise to compete with Microsoft," McAfee said in a statement.

The antivirus company indicated it would try and stay ahead of the game by expanding into emerging technology markets, including catering for an increasingly mobile user base.

"McAfee is moving security beyond the PC. There are new, growing opportunities with emerging threat environments such as the growth of home Wi-Fi home networks, mobile phones and PC To Go devices through the U3 platform," the company said. "Our long term goal is to ensure that our customers are protected whenever they are connected to a network."

However, security company Sophos claimed on Tuesday that Microsoft's arrival in the security business may cause serious problems for security vendors that sell to home users.

"McAfee, Symantec, and Trend Micro may have nervous jitters about this. Microsoft may cause problems for security vendors who provide for home users," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos.

Sophos acknowledged, though, that existing players in the security space may be better equipped than Microsoft.

"Important attributes for security vendors are being able to move quickly, and responsiveness. Now I don't know whether Microsoft has these [attributes]," Cluley added.

Microsoft OneCare beta was made freely available on 30 November, and will launch sometime in 2006.

Topic: Security

Tom Espiner

About Tom Espiner

Tom is a technology reporter for ZDNet.com. He covers the security beat, writing about everything from hacking and cybercrime to threats and mitigation. He also focuses on open source and emerging technologies, all the while trying to cut through greenwash.

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  • OneCare free? Have you actually read the EULA that comes with it and fully understood it?

    Take the one that comes with Windows Live Safety Center beta for instance and take into account what you're agreeing with in exchange for what even before you can actually use it and see for yourself if expectations raised are actually delivered.

    As for McAfee and others. They're well advised (again) to start helping their customers to adopt Microsoft alternatives. Not only will that help them not being dependant on a single horse it'll also help ensuring that Microsoft stays a much nicer business partner to deal with. Problem for McAfee and others is ofcourse that they booted out the brains and skills to do that quickly a long time ago thinking that that would help their bottom line in the short and long run. How wrong can one be. The only two constants in IT are damage and change. Nothing lasts forever. Everything changes. Better think ahead and prepare. The profits that come with market leadership (or betting on a single horse) can vanish within a year and then those savings from a few years ago are suddenly undone many times over. Being able and capable to turn the boat in a different direction whenever needed is simply an investment for the future.
    anonymous