Dion Hinchcliffe

Contributor

Dion Hinchcliffe is an expert in information technology, business strategy, and next-generation enterprises. He is currently VP and Principal Analyst at Constellation Research as well as Chief Strategy Officer at 7Summits. A veteran of enterprise IT, Dion has been working for two decades with leading-edge methods to bridge the widening gap between business and technology. He has extensive practical experience with enterprise technologies and he consults, advises, and writes prolifically on social business, IT, and enterprise architecture. Dion still works in the trenches with clients in the Fortune 1000, government, and Internet startup community. He is also a sought-after keynote speaker and is co-author of several books on 2.0 subjects including Web 2.0 Architectures from O'Reilly as well as the best-selling Social Business By Design from John Wiley & Sons (May, 2012.)

Dion's Current and Past Clients: AIIM, AOL, Alcatel-Lucent, Best Buy, CBS Interactive, JackBe ING, Intuit, Microsoft, Nexplore, Qualcomm, T. Rowe Price, Techweb, The World Bank, 1105 Media Reply Italy, O'Reilly Media, LG CNS, LMI, Accenture, 2BeWise, 4Sports LLC, Gucci, IBM, Incubeta, Kapow Technologies, Mansueto Digital, Near-Time, nGenera, Swisscom, Sys-Con, Viscape, Coca-Cola, McKinsey & Company, Hasbro, CDW, IDG

Latest from Dion Hinchcliffe

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The advent of the citizen developer

The advent of the citizen developer

Software development can be carried out by almost anyone with only a little technical know-how. This is unleashing a new generation of business coder, along with a matching wave of grassroots apps that solve long-neglected problems in the enterprise.

April 18, 2016 by

Social suites vs. apps: The tension between bloat and refinement

Social suites vs. apps: The tension between bloat and refinement

For many, the giant size of today's social software suites is too much, while the simple functional focus of individual social apps isn't enough. How can enterprises best cope with this bloat vs. refinement divide? The answer partially lies in how control of IT software selection and acquisition is going to change over the next half decade.

November 3, 2010 by

The story of Web 2.0 and SOA continues - Part 1

The story of Web 2.0 and SOA continues - Part 1

It's nearly the middle of 2007 already and I've had occasion to sit down and look at where Web 2.0 and SOA software models have evolved lately. Partly it's because we're now seeing some of the bigger software companies seriously embrace lightweight SOA recently, and it's also because we're continuing to see more clearly that Web 2.0 and SOA really are largely (but not 100%) the same concepts that merely lay on different -- if fairly different -- parts of the software continuum. Here's the latest on this story.

May 17, 2007 by

Enterprise mashups get ready for prime-time

Enterprise mashups get ready for prime-time

Last year we witnessed the rise of consumer mashups on the Web, with hundreds of individual mashup-based Web applications being released in 2006 alone. I covered this phenomenon in detail in my year-end mashup wrap-up, but now this innovation in software development is gearing up to move inside the enterprise as a raft of tools get ready to provide the tools to make it possible. What will this mean for IT departments and end-users? Let's take a look.

January 19, 2007 by

The next generation of Web stacks: High productivity and a touch of controversy

The next generation of Web stacks: High productivity and a touch of controversy

I'm on an Amtrak train as I write this heading to New York City where I'll get a chance to see Harvard's Andrew McAfee of Enterprise 2.0 fame speak at Interop, a chance I'll get twice in the next two days, so expect some coverage here shortly. On my ride, I thought I'd address some of the good points fellow ZDNetter Ryan Stewart made last week about the rise of new Rich Internet Applications (RIA) technologies such as Flex and OpenLaszlo. Ryan wrote about the advantage of having a robust, modern Web stack supporting a RIA aplication.

September 19, 2006 by

Assembling great software: A round-up of eight mashup tools

Assembling great software: A round-up of eight mashup tools

There is a frequently recurring piece of software development lore that plays on the fact that good programmers are supposed to be lazy. In these stories, a good programmer will take a frequently recurring, monotonous task (like testing) and instead of doing it by hand, will instead write a piece of code once that will do the task for them, thereby automating it for future use.

September 2, 2006 by

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