Natalie Gagliordi

Staff Writer

Natalie Gagliordi is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Louisville, Kentucky, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously worked as the editor of Kiosk Marketplace, an online B2B trade publication that focused on interactive self-service technology, while also contributing to additional websites that covered retail technology, digital signage hardware and mobile payment trends. Natalie attended George Washington University, where she studied communication sciences, and also the University of South Florida, where she received a B.A. in News-Editorial Journalism.

Natalie Gagliordi has nothing to disclose. She does not hold investments in the technology companies she covers.

Latest from Natalie Gagliordi

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Pooping on Oracle's party

Pooping on Oracle's party

Updated 9/26/05 9:40 AM: While all eyes were on Oracle this week, we were busy pulling together our proprietary data that shows how the burgeoning software maker has fared over the year in our directory of IT resources and where it stood among competing vendors in our IT Priorities survey.

September 23, 2005 by

Analysts deliberate latest merger wave

Analysts deliberate latest merger wave

So you've had your fill of spin on the latest round of tech mergers, but throwing into the mix some independent analyst perspectives on the Oracle/Siebel and eBay/Skype deals couldn't hurt. Oracle/SiebelNucleus Research gives Oracle high marks for its acquisition of Siebel, saying that the combination of each vendor's technologies will bode well for customers that recognize the value of integrating data from multiple sources to streamline customer support and service.

September 13, 2005 by

Annual per-user cost of SAP 12 times higher than PeopleSoft, study finds

Annual per-user cost of SAP 12 times higher than PeopleSoft, study finds

A research note published this month from the scrupulous team at Nucleus Research examined what companies spent on hardware, software, consulting, and so on, over a 3-year period for PeopleSoft Enterprise. The results:Eighty-two percent of PeopleSoft customers interviewed had achieved a positive ROI from their deployments, with an average payback period of 32 months.

April 28, 2005 by

Why do competitors hate Oracle?

Why do competitors hate Oracle?

Chances are you either have a strong aversion or fondness for some IT vendors—just take a glance at the Talkback of any Microsoft vs. Linux story and you'll see what I mean.

April 21, 2005 by

'Safety Net' fund embodies spirit of PeopleSoft

'Safety Net' fund embodies spirit of PeopleSoft

Signs of the remarkable culture at PeopleSoft still shine even if the company is no longer in the hands of its employees. AMR Research reports that former employees have created a fund called The Safety Net, or TSN, to help colleagues who suffer financial problems as a result of the acquisition by Oracle in late December.

March 31, 2005 by

Study shows PeopleSoft users leaning to ditch software post-merger

Study shows PeopleSoft users leaning to ditch software post-merger

eWeek: A report from The Yankee Group shows that a considerable number of PeopleSoft organizations say that they're inclined tobail on the software following the merger.Yankee recently surveyed 192 PeopleSoft customers and found that an average of 46% demonstrated a propensity for switching applications, and an average of 30% remaining undecided.

March 4, 2005 by

IDC's musings on OpenSolaris

IDC's musings on OpenSolaris

In response to Sun's plan to launch its open source program for Solaris, IDC analysts expect the company to gain followers, caveats not withstanding:Sun could establish a strong community supporting its product, and thiscommunity could increase interest in Solaris and Sun's hardware products.

February 7, 2005 by

No surprise--Sun shines when it comes to open source

No surprise--Sun shines when it comes to open source

Here's a news flash--of sorts--for those following recent developments in Sun products and services. IT decision-makers appear to care a great deal more aboutwhat Sun is doing around making Solaris open source than they do about what Sun is doing to make utility computing more affordable and available.

February 1, 2005 by

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