Micron unveils 25nm Nand flash SSD range

Micron unveils 25nm Nand flash SSD range

Summary: Storage company Micron has brought out its RealSSD C400 range of flash drives, which are the first to use 25nm Nand flash technology.The new RealSSD range of solid-state drives (SSD), announced on Wednesday, use a 25nm production process for Nand flash memory that was co-developed with Intel in the first months of 2010.

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TOPICS: Storage
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Storage company Micron has brought out its RealSSD C400 range of flash drives, which are the first to use 25nm Nand flash technology.

The new RealSSD range of solid-state drives (SSD), announced on Wednesday, use a 25nm production process for Nand flash memory that was co-developed with Intel in the first months of 2010.

The range has "greater performance and higher capacities than [Micron's] previous generation SSDs", Micron's vice president of memory system development Dean Klein said in a statement.

The drives come in four capacities: 64GB, 128GB, 256GB and 512GB. They are available in 1.8-inch and 2.5-inch form factors. Their previous series — the C300 — scaled up to 256GB.

The drives use multi-level cell technology, which allows two bits of data to be stored in each individual cell. This means drive density is higher than in drives using single-level technology, which allows for one bit, but is lower than drives using triple-level, which can store three bits and was also co-developed with Intel and demonstrated in August.

RealSSD drives will support the Sata 6Gbps interface, which should increase response and boots times, Micron says. The drives have backwards compatibility for Sata 3Gbps. Fastest read speed is 415MBps. The 512GB drive has a sustained read write speed of 260MBps with write speeds falling for other drives as their capacity shrinks.

The drives will be sold online under the name of Crucial m4 SSD by Micron subsidiary Crucial and through global channel partners in the first quarter of 2011. Pricing was not disclosed.

Topic: Storage

Jack Clark

About Jack Clark

Currently a reporter for ZDNet UK, I previously worked as a technology researcher and reporter for a London-based news agency.

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