Microsoft to suspend certain email security notifications

Microsoft to suspend certain email security notifications

Summary: UPDATED: Citing government policies, as of July 1 Microsoft will no longer use email to issue certain security notifications.

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As of July 1, Microsoft will no longer use email to issue notifications for certain security events:

  • Security bulletin advance notifications
  • Security bulletin summaries
  • New security advisories and bulletins
  • Major and minor revisions to security advisories and bulletins

The announcement, received (ironically) on the Microsoft Security Notifications email list, attributes the decision to "...changing governmental policies concerning the issuance of automated electronic messaging..."

Microsoft recommends that IT professionals sign up for notifications using one of the company's security RSS feeds.

UPDATE: It appears that the change is due to a new Canadian anti-spam law which goes into effect on July 1. Microsoft Canada has an opt-in page for users to allow emails.

Topics: Security, Government, Microsoft

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11 comments
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  • Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation

    Canada's anti-spam legislation covering electronic messaging comes into full effect on July 1st, 2014 and would apply to any automated emails Microsoft sends to Canadian residents. So given the timing of this Microsoft announcement, I'm guessing the two are related.
    software_canuck
    • makes sense

      I just heard this from a colleague too. Makes sense. But surely Microsoft has email notifications for much more than just security. Why haven't there been other such announcements?
      larry@...
  • Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation

    Canada's anti-spam legislation covering electronic messaging comes into full effect on July 1st, 2014 and would apply to any automated emails Microsoft sends to Canadian residents. So given the timing of this Microsoft announcement, I'm guessing the two are related.
    software_canuck
  • Canada's

    it is pretty draconian. You can't email anyone you've had no business relationship with for two years. One could argue service packs, etc. constitute an ongoing relationship, but my guess is they do not wish to risk it.
    Mac_PC_FenceSitter
    • The law

      A service pack? No.
      It would be more like you requesting services from Microsoft.
      Gisabun
  • Of course, MS could just admit to sending spam in the first place...

    :)
    jessepollard
    • or you could just admit to trolling

      in the first place.:)
      hoppmang
    • Of course, jesse could just admit to posting spam in the first place...

      :)
      William.Farrel
      • What spam?

        A bit of a troll above, I will accept.

        But done strictly tongue in cheek... :)
        jessepollard
        • It was not funny

          You are not funny. You are a troll.

          Your troll comments like the one above is about as welcome as a latter days saints missionary.

          You cannot disguise your inept trolling attempt under the guise as "being funny" under a tongue in cheek claim.
          honeymonster
  • Canadian law

    it is a bit odd. I received an Email from SANS today. While not based in Canada, they went a different route by saying that unless we hear from you we'll keep on sending Emails [they do give an Email to opt out or at the bottom of any Email from them]. They didn't have to do this as they have nothing in Canada [I'm assuming] except when they have their courses.
    The law itself really can't do much against those outside Canada.
    Microsoft, on the other hand, has a Canadian division. I already received an email regarding the law for Canadian specific Emails. They could of followed SANS on the US side.
    Why they decided to do world-wide is odd. Now you have to resort to either the RSS feeds or go to their web site.
    Already, some are saying it is the toughest anti-spam law in the world. Don't be surprised if the US, UK and others look at it any apply something similar there [or maybe Microsoft figured it will happen soon].
    Gisabun