Myki imports expert help

Myki imports expert help

Summary: Victorian Transport Minister Martin Pakula announced yesterday that myki contractor Kamco has "flown in" experts from overseas to troubleshoot Victoria's troubled public transport e-ticketing system.

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TOPICS: Government AU
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Victorian Transport Minister Martin Pakula announced yesterday that myki contractor Kamco has "flown in" experts from overseas to troubleshoot Victoria's troubled public transport e-ticketing system.

A myki reader
(Credit: Transport
Ticketing Authority)

"Kamco has flown in experts from overseas to help resolve outstanding issues and get myki working on all modes," said Pakula in a statement yesterday.

Paluka acknowledged some of the difficulties the system had been encountering, and stated that the government would be working directly with the myki contractor.

"The government is obviously frustrated that the contractor has not met its contractual requirements to deliver myki," he said.

The Victorian Government also announced yesterday that it has appointed a new chief executive for the Transport Ticketing Authority (TTA), which is in charge of the myki roll-out.

Gary Thwaites, who has held the position of TTA chief since June 2008, will be replaced by the current head of the public transport marketing body Metlink Bernie Carolan. The change was effective immediately.

Thwaites appointment was not without controversy after it was revealed that he was married to the myki project's former probity auditor Josie Thwaites.

"As the current Metlink chief executive, Mr Carolan has overall responsibility for providing public transport services with coordinated information about ticketing, fares and services," said the Transport minister.

According to Melbourne newspaper The Age, Thwaites will now "take a break for a while" and will likely rejoin the transport department or another government agency later this year. The Age also reported that Thwaites was "sacked".

This has not been the first high level staff change related to the myki program, with the resignation of Transport Minister Lynne Kosky last month.

Topic: Government AU

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4 comments
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  • Why overseas?

    Why are we flying in people from overseas to look at this? I can't believe that we do not have the expertise in Australia, or even just Melbourne to look into this.

    If it is so complex that it can only be fixed by selected engineers from overseas, why on earth are we using it!?!?
    anonymous
  • Why Overseas?

    Ask yourself where the software was developed? Overseas not to mention offshore. Suspect it is riddled with all the issues that comes with those decisions
    anonymous
  • Why overseas?

    Hate to give you a reality check, but Australia doesn't have a big industry in developing these types of systems.

    By building it in Australia is by no means a way of insuring it against problems. In fact it can be worse when we assume we have the expertise here and go it alone.

    From what I've read it seems that Myki was built with a "go it alone" approach, just read the defensive statement on the Myki website stating you can't buy such a system off the shelf (even though many very similar systems exist around the world).

    Governments are going to be more attracted to systems that "keep jobs here" even if it ends up costing more and achieving less in the long term.
    anonymous
  • Myki

    Metcard is an efficient public transport ticketing system. Myki is an efficient? public surveillance system feeding a continually updated electronic archive of citizen movement, consequently governments of all persuasions will spend whatever it takes to make it work, while also trying to program it to sell transport tickets to make it seem more benign.
    anonymous