NBN Co: 26Tbps record proves fibre right

NBN Co: 26Tbps record proves fibre right

Summary: The National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co) has heralded the results of a German experiment that achieved a record data transfer rate of 26 terabits per second (Tbps) over a single fibre optic cable, stating that this demonstrates the longevity of the technology.

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TOPICS: NBN, Broadband
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The National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co) has heralded the results of a German experiment that achieved a record data transfer rate of 26 terabits per second (Tbps) over a single fibre optic cable, stating that this demonstrates the longevity of the technology.

Fibre

(PC010094 image by Bill Burris, CCBY-SA 2.0)

Researchers from Germany's Karlsruhe Institute of Technology revealed on Sunday that they had successfully transmitted the equivalent of 200,000 high-resolution images, 400 million phone calls or 700 DVDs across 50km in one second.

This was achieved by using a single laser to create a number of pulses known as "frequency combs" that are each separated by a wavelength of 12.5GHz. These were then compacted into 325 colour channels using a method of Fourier transform before being sent down the fibre optic cable.

There have been concerns that fibre optic technology may be outdated by the network's completion in 2020. However, NBN Co's chief technology officer, Gary McLaren, said that the results of the test showed that the decision to have NBN Co roll out fibre to 93 per cent of the population was the right call.

"The amount of data people are transferring across communications networks, especially video transmissions, is increasing all the time. As fibre optic technology improves, so too will speeds and the amount of data that can be carried over the network we are building today," he said. "This gives us confidence that we're delivering the right communications infrastructure to sustain our nation for decades to come."

Topics: NBN, Broadband

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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59 comments
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  • Well...!
    Rizz-cd230
    • Check out what Alan Jones has to say about this:

      http://www.news.com.au/technology/shock-jock-impressed-by-laser-speed-breakthrough/story-e6frfro0-1226062824273

      ha these anti-NBN crusaders really are clowns... just lol.
      Hubert Cumberdale
    • Check out what Alan Jones has to say about this:

      http://www.news.com.au/technology/shock-jock-impressed-by-laser-speed-breakthrough/story-e6frfro0-1226062824273

      ha these anti-NBN crusaders really are clowns... just lol.
      Hubert Cumberdale
      • LOL...

        So either alain/advocate gets all his info from AJ or he is in fact AJ...!
        Rizz-cd230
  • Anyone who says that fibre will be outdated before the network is complete is just spreading FUD. Same fools believe we can be services by 4g wireless networks. Just ignore them.
    gr1f
    • That's exactly right gr1f, one of the arguments I've encountered is that the NBN is not needed because wireless speeds are improving however the real world 4G speeds have so far been dismal, I'm sure they will improve but they will never be able to keep up with fibre, this latest speed record is proof of that. 26Tbps Just amazing.
      Hubert Cumberdale
    • Here we go again ... confusing backbone requirements with connectivity to the home requirements.

      Few (any?) have an issue with the backbone buildout... and that's what this article is really about, a capability more appropriate for the backbone/trunk purposes.

      The contentious issue is installing fibre into 10 million homes (that's about 6000 per workday over 7 years), when existing technologies meet the reqts just fine with expansion and improvements, and the new wireless solutions now rolling out.... at much less cost.
      FiberLover
      • Whilst I agree the rollout could be better handled with a phased deployment changing from copper to fiber as copper meets EOL (quite close btw) - to suggest that current technologies and wireless solutions meet the needs of anything more than simple home users is offensive. If I could get data into regional centers at a faster and more cost efficient way, we could start hiring in regional areas rather than being concentrated in the city.
        Camm-a0c75
        • " ... to suggest that current technologies and wireless solutions meet the needs of anything more than simple home users is offensive. ..."

          Oh you mean the simple home users that make up 75%+ of home users population that will get FTTH. As I have said previously, FTTH is an overkill for the majority of users, who may never use the features of FTTH, particularly as other alternative technologies improve.

          (btw sounds like you are easily offended.)
          FiberLover
  • "said that the results of the test showed that the decision to have NBN Co roll out fibre to 93 per cent of the population was the right call"

    That makes no sense.. these days everyone's a politician! When the LTE-A specification was released (for 1Gbps) NBNCo didn't come out and say - we made a mistake.

    What people should be focussing on is the economics not the technology. Economics say we need demand for the product, economics say that people want it the same or cheaper than today's products. Economics say we'll need to pay back the capital cost of the NBN.

    It doesn't matter if scientists are sending petabits through fibre, we need a prudent path to fibre. And I believe a sudden jump to fibre at top dollar is not prudent. The current plan is unaffordable.
    merarischroeder
    • "these days everyone's a politician" and every seems to think their a network engineer.

      Anyone who has worked in data communications in a professional capacity knows you don't design a network just for today. You design in growth for years to come. That's what fibre is all about. Capacity for today and also a significant time into the future.
      Steve123-b6932
    • "top dollar"

      Define top dollar.

      "The current plan is unaffordable."

      Based on what?
      Hubert Cumberdale
  • Old technology! Outdated before it's even here! Don't these people know that the aliens are going to teach us their quantum communication technology in 2012? Or that the market, left to its own devices, will invent their unicorn-rainbow matrix that will whirl away all data hassles in a magical, fragrant splash of colour?
    Gwyntaglaw
  • Last time I checked, Tbps refers to Tera BITS / sec, not Tera BYTES / sec.
    igor_santic
    • You are correct. Sorry isantic, that was a typo. Has now been fixed.

      Josh Taylor
      Josh Taylor
  • The only thing we proved on the network is that it's fast with no load on it.
    I highly doubt it will achieve those speeds when Centrelink, Medicare and 80% of the country are on it, all using it at the same time.
    cootified
    • LOL...

      That's what happens now...D'oh!
      Rizz-cd230
    • Also, most government departments operate on dark fiber and wont be transitioning.
      Camm-a0c75
      • That depends....

        If the agency is Canberra-centric it may be using its own fibre (on a campus), ICON, T, O or PowerTel, in which case little or no change.

        If they have a WAN with CBD sites around the country they'll probably be using T, O or PowerTel, etc fibre, again little change.

        However if they have outer suburban or regional sites they'll probably be moving to NBN fibre, using T, O or PowerTel as the provider.
        FiberLover
  • Errrr, what does this all mean?

    The 'tech heads' get all excited and now thinks this validates NBN Co????

    Fibres still have a finite lifetime before replacement. Most of us know you can send a truck load of data down it. The question is really "is FTTP financial viable" by the government at the moment. And the answer is "no".
    Theguy-bbb4a