NBN Co 'commercial response' to TPG due by September

NBN Co 'commercial response' to TPG due by September

Summary: Apartments and offices in New South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland will be connected to the NBN Co's fibre by 24 September, as part of the company's plan to speed up its fibre rollout in a "commercial response" to TPG.

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TOPICS: NBN, Australia
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The latest NBN Co rollout and Disconnection Dates (PDF) list published by Telstra has revealed that NBN Co plans to rollout its fibre to apartments and offices in areas targeted by TPG by 24 September.

The document shows that the NBN fibre-to-the-building rollout will hit Millers Point in NSW, Sydney's Haymarket, South Melbourne, Melbourne's Docklands, along with Queensland's New Farm, and Fortitude Valley.

A spokesperson for NBN Co said that the delay from the original "middle of the year" target was due to finalising agreements with each of the bodies corporate in the rollout areas.

"These are buildings that will form the market trial, which is intended to test our processes, systems and capabilities for releasing  and deploying single Multiple-Dwelling Units," the spokesperson said.

"Nevertheless, our view remains the same as it was in April: the NBN represents the sensible solution for owners of MDUs and the families and businesses they house. That's because as a wholesale only open access network,  the NBN offers a level playing field for all retail telecommunications providers and therefore opens up real retail competition."

NBN Co sped up its fibre rollout to these high-value areas as a "commercial response" to TPG's plans to provide fibre to the building to 500,000 premises across metropolitan locations in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane, and Perth.

TPG announced last September, in its annual results, that it was aiming to increase the number of buildings connected to its fibre backhaul network in metro areas and to offer download speeds to consumers of up to 100Mbps.

In February, NBN Co chairman Ziggy Switkowski said that while TPG's plans did not appear to be a threat to the company, he admitted that cherry picking — infrastructure builders rolling out their own fibre networks in highly profitable areas — could undermine the business model for the NBN.

"Any cherry-picking initiative by companies like TPG and others has the potential to undermine the economics of NBN Co," he said at the time.

Topics: NBN, Australia

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3 comments
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  • It's Not Cherry Picking if NBN is Ignoring You

    NBN had no intention of servicing south melbourne, albert park or port melbourne - all areas of high density, and areas with significant concentrations of digital media. The NBNCo refused consistently to commit to a date "any time in the next ten years" to service these areas .... until TPG offered a competitive product. NBNCo have no-one to blame for their appalling commercial success except themselves. The resident, business and tax payer should not be blackmailed by the incompetence of NBNCo to deliver a workable solution in a reasonable timeframe.
    bztdarryl
  • Fibre to the Press Release

    NBNco made a wild unrealistic claim and have unsurprisingly failed to deliver. Yet, while some of the places listed (Haymarket, Millers Point) should presently have quite good ADSL2+ (appx 20Mbps) due to being very close to exchanges, other places like Pyrmont with crappy ADSL due to exchange distance, and large numbers of MDUs, are overlooked again. Prioritisation of under-served areas, clearly not !
    Quite why NBNco needs to 'trial' MDU processes when they are already installing into MDUs is unclear....unless of course those buildings are trialling FTTB/VDSL ?
    Trebus
  • NBN's Monopoly behavour

    Switkowsky's response is a reminder of his behaviour when running Telstra.. He could care less about competition !

    It is also reminiscent of the Post Master Generals Department & Telecom in the early days of competition. Their attitude was always.. We'll do it our way, you can all get stuffed.

    Remember when it took 2 years to get a phone line installed. Remember how long it was before Telstra released it's ADSL2+.. only when it was faced with competition from other ISP's !

    So typical of organisation who have a monopoly. They don't give a RA.

    Competition is a wonderful thing !

    I do know my locaction, South Melbourne, wasn't even on their 10 year plan, until TPG threatened the NBN Mandrins with, competition, ..'beating !' them into submission with the loss of their monopoly.

    Is this what we'll have to contend with, when the NBN is completed, they will have a virtual monopoly & there will be no competition ?.

    As much as I want an NBN & FTTP, (not MT's cobbled monstrosity which will use Telstra's OLD wires that are falling apart & will require huge expenditure, to repair all it's problems & even replace most of the thinning wires, (copper does corrode (oxidation) when exposed to the atmosphere!),.... I'm concerned with NBN's dictatorship behaviour so early in it's life, something we were told, would not happen ! ..

    It's a worry !
    Huntsman.ks