NBN Co gets ITU backing on satellite plans

NBN Co gets ITU backing on satellite plans

Summary: NBN Co has said that its planned satellite launch is following the correct international procedures, providing a statement from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) as proof.

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TOPICS: NBN, Broadband
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NBN Co has said that its planned satellite launch is following the correct international procedures, providing a statement from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) as proof.

On Monday, NBN Co CEO Mike Quigley said that the company is going through a process with the ITU to get approval for four orbital slots covering Australia from 135 degrees east, at 5-degree increments each for its satellite-broadband service that will deliver broadband to 4 of the 7 per cent of Australia not covered by the fibre roll-out of the National Broadband Network (NBN).

Although the slots have not yet been approved, NBN Co has begun the design and construction of the $620 million satellites with Loral, on the basis that it will receive those orbital slots, with Quigley stating he expects the slot approval process to be completed prior to the satellite launches in 2015.

Shadow Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull has questioned the amount of risk that NBN Co has taken by doing this, even though securing the slots is not certain. However, Quigley said that it is not the kind of risk that keeps him awake at night.

Following the hearing, NBN Co approached the ITU, which said it is not uncommon for a satellite company to purchase satellites before they are allocated slots.

"It is possible for a company to purchase a satellite in advance of it being put into use and the orbital slots being finalised," the ITU said, according to NBN Co.

NBN Co must notify the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) to initialise the registration process with the ITU, and then resolve any compatibility issues with the operators of neighbouring satellites, the ITU said.

"So long as there are no regional objections, and the ITU registration process is underway, an operator can proceed with its launch plans."

To back itself up, NBN Co also provided statements from Optus' former chief technology officer Bill Hope, who has been consulted as an expert on the NBN satellite development. He said that Optus launched its own satellite several years before getting approval for slots, and that anyone who suggests that NBN Co is taking highly unusual risks "does not understand the process, or is being disingenuous".

Following his speech to the Communications Day 2012 Summit in Sydney this morning, Turnbull told journalists that this sort of information would have been better provided when he asked on Monday.

"It's a pity they couldn't provide an answer like that at the Senate inquiry. The criticisms that have been made of their approach have been made by other experts in the satellite industry," he said. "My role at the inquiry was to ask the questions, and try to find out exactly what the position was."

Turnbull said that whether this is a responsible risk is a matter for others in the satellite industry to decide, and that there has been some disagreement in the industry over the matter.

No need to end Telstra deal

Turnbull's speech to the telecommunications industry today broadly reflected on the past three years of the NBN roll-out, clocking the $1 billion network as only passing 5000 homes as yet, which equates to three premises per working day. To meet its new three-year plan, NBN Co must now step up the rate to 6000 premises per day.

He reiterated his previous statements that the Coalition's fibre-to-the-node approach would be cheaper and delivered faster.

"The Coalition's policy is, as you know, focused on achieving a comparable outcome (ubiquitous, very fast broadband), but achieving it sooner in terms of roll-out, cheaper in terms of cost to taxpayers and more affordably in terms of consumers," he said.

After his speech, Turnbull indicated to journalists that under his proposal, parts of the $11 billion Telstra agreement concerning payments to migrate customers onto the new network could be built in to an agreement to get access to the last mile of copper network from the node to the premise.

"I think the approach I've described would be manifestly in Telstra's interest. [Telstra] hasn't shown any anxiety about a change of government," he said. "If you roll it out sooner, the migration payments would be received sooner, and while the nominal value of those migration payments may be no different ... the net present value, which is what Telstra is focused on, will be greater, because it will be received sooner."

Topics: NBN, Broadband

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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37 comments
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  • Another day. Another of Malcolms claims laid bare as fiction.

    Seriously, if MT was not a politician, you'd be suing him for libel or asking for a gag order.
    gr1f
  • "NBN Co must notify the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) to initialise the registration process with the ITU, and then resolve any compatibility issues with the operators of neighbouring satellites, the ITU said."

    Clearly there were questions to be asked - MT is doing a good job. The above from the ITU indicated that NBN.co have not even begun the process of securing the slots, while at the same time going ahead with purchasing the satellites. Thats just stupid and good reason for criticism.

    There is no fiction, only your own FUD.
    Frergers
    • There is no fiction just your obedience to a political party and their cause, good boy.
      Beta-9f71a
      • I know that you do not believe in democracy, just subservience to your socialist liars.

        Senate committees are a valuable part of democracy, something you do not understand. Let us now hear you bag Oakshott also, since he also is not at all happy with NBN.co's obfuscation.....
        Frergers
        • Have you ever had a thought of your own?

          Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

          Still haven't answered those 4 simple questions...LOL

          The truth is just too hard for you, so just keep running Forrest
          Beta-9f71a
  • So MT, here's a Relevant Question for you: How is your fibre to the node going to deliver "very fast broadband" over our present service limiting, past it's use by date & neglected copper last mile?
    grump3
  • So FTTN speeds will still be a 'up to' with no guarentee of what speed you will actually get. Someone close to the node could get 80mbit, while 300meters away someone else gets 20mbit. More disparity is exactly what we need *rolls eyes*
    Tiberio-d2a73
    • “So FTTN speeds will still be a 'up to' with no guarentee of what speed you will actually get.”

      Not only that if you want all the benefits that fibre brings you have to wait until everyone in your community demands it, if there is little or no demand for it you’ll be stuck with FTTN for a very long time as no one will want to roll out fibre in areas that are deemed not profitable.
      Hubert Cumberdale
      • Thats just nonsense. If you want fibre from the node, just pay for it. Simple.

        Since when was the principle of "user pays" a bad thing? It creates jobs, cuts waste, makes SENSE (since most people do not want 100Mbps)..... you guys just want it for "free"..... game boys and porn addicts all want FTTH... why do you want it?
        Frergers
        • That's the spirit, spoken like a true supremacist would.

          Only those who are able to afford it should be able to access 100Mbps.

          **** the poor eh, they should just have dial up, if they can afford that.

          You are a disgracel.

          And show us your proof that most people don't want 100Mbps or admit to being a liar.
          Beta-9f71a
          • Trolls.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(Internet)

            Do not feed them.
            RealismBias
          • You are giving him way too much credit RealismBias. A real troll wouldn't have made such a rudimentary mistake and admit to being a porn addict like that.
            Hubert Cumberdale
          • You raise a good point.
            RealismBias
          • +1 yet again RealismBias.

            I do have a bad feeding habit (that's the first step, admission...LOL).

            As such, perhaps in future I should recite one of two thing before I post, in response to such individuals...

            1. Hi, I'm Beta and I'm a feed-a-holic
            2. Goosfraba

            ;-)
            Beta-9f71a
          • "Only those who are able to afford it should be able to access 100Mbps."

            So you are saying that those who cannot afford a connection now will be able to afford a 100Mbps connection on the NBN?? LMAO!!!

            Spoken like a true sheep.......
            Frergers
        • "Thats just nonsense. If you want fibre from the node, just pay for it. Simple."

          And using that logic it would include those in the wireless & satellite coverage areas. Simple. Glad we got that issue sorted.




          "Since when was the principle of "user pays" a bad thing? It creates jobs, cuts waste, makes SENSE"

          Congratulations dummy you just described the NBN. So yeah thanks for confirming that. NBN: It makes SENSE.




          "since most people do not want 100Mbps"

          False.
          Hubert Cumberdale
          • Ok bright boys, show me the numbers: HOW MANY of those already on the NBN have signed up for 100Mbps and what is the percentage *snigger*.

            Beta - I am all for helping the disadvantaged who cannot afford things. Yes, I agree that provision should be made for them.

            As for your wireless/satellite comment Humbert, thats just dumb. You already know my position in regard to that, however YOU are unable to elucidate on a solution to the fact that the proposed service is second rate.....
            Frergers
  • Ahhh Beta, Beta, Beta Beta..... do you actually knwo what "Beta" means". As always, sidestepping simple questions. Here you lot are mouthing that everybody wants 100Mbps, without a shred of evidense to prove it. So, for your own satisfaction I asked you to look at the numbers for those who ALREADY ARE ON THE NBN and then to tell us all what percentage of those are on 100Mbps plans. Simple enough task, but you are too afraid to look at the truth.

    User pays in not a bad thing at all for dole bludgers (and don't give me that leftist crap that there is no such thing, you very well know otherwise). For those in genuine need, yes, I think the government should help, no contradiction there whatsover other than to your misguided views as to how I think.

    1. I am not on holiday.

    2. You know very well that was sarcasm

    3. Yes, funding is coming from government bonds, however unlike you who continues to spread misinformation that ALL the funding is coming from bonds, I know for a fact that up until 2015 only around $300 million is coming from bonds, the remainder of OVER $16 billion is coming from TAXPAYER's money.

    4. Yes
    Frergers
    • "Here you lot are mouthing that everybody wants 100Mbps, without a shred of evidense to prove it."

      I just did.


      "So, for your own satisfaction I asked you to look at the numbers for those who ALREADY ARE ON THE NBN and then to tell us all what percentage of those are on 100Mbps plans. "

      37%.
      Hubert Cumberdale
    • Wow thank you.... now we are actually getting somewhere, somewhat adultly and even, dare I say it too soon, rationally...

      Now that wasn't really so hard was it.

      1. OK.

      Get to work then ;-)

      2. No you were serious...

      So if I find I have erred somewhere, can I use that excuse too? Bet it won't cut the mustard if the boot is on the other foot, eh?

      3. Yes, bonds was one example.

      But as you say and as I have said all along, funding is coming from other sources too, as clearly indicated by Conroy from day 1.

      Again here is what I said 30 MARCH, way before you and I started any of this, and I quote...

      ..."coming from the sale of bonds, securities, BAF, contingency fund, NOT general taxation... although granted that is always an option"...

      http://www.zdnet.com.au/vic-govt-pans-nbn-three-year-roll-out-339334940.htm

      Which part of this says bonds only?

      So if you have any credibility at all, please DO NOT lie and misrepresent what I have said any further, it is all there in B&W.

      Again I reiterate once more, using the Parliamentary Libraries data - "funding is not coming from our income taxes". From the horses mouth again, "taxation revenue is a potential source of funding, but it is not an allocation to date".

      BTW - the $300m you keep harping on about of for 2010/11. Whereas, this is an article from early 2011/12...

      http://www.smh.com.au/business/government-goes-global-to-raise-3b-needed-for-national-network-20110710-1h91o.html

      Again read this from a professor of economics, if you seriously want to broaden your entrenched economic views.

      http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=9281

      4. Since we (according to you) don't understand, lets hear your NBN alternative.

      And feel free to leave me other pertinent info, which I will read, because I am not here on a political crusade - like most who oppose the NBN (imo) - I simply believe the NBN will be great for "all of us - you and your's included"...!
      Beta-9f71a