NBN company details hard to find

NBN company details hard to find

Summary: Details of the company established to bring the Federal Government's $43 billion broadband vision to life remained unavailable this week, despite government assurances it had been registered.

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Details of the company established to bring the Federal Government's $43 billion broadband vision to life remained unavailable this week, despite government assurances it had been registered.

ASIC does not appear to have a record of a company by the name the minister mentioned

Shadow Communications Minister Nick Minchin

In a speech on Tuesday to the National Press Club in Canberra, Communications Minister Stephen Conroy said the company had been "established", with a search to kick off shortly to find its chief executive. He named the company in associated speech notes as the "National Broadband Network Company".

A spokesperson for Conroy later said the company was incorporated with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission on 8 April "under the normal processes", although they were not able to provide further details and have not (at the time of print) disclosed the associated Australian Company Number (ACN).

Broad searches by the opposition and ZDNet.com.au of ASIC's database and the Australian Business Register for the company's registration details have not been successful in finding the company's details.

"Senator Conroy clearly stated that the National Broadband Network Company has been established on behalf of Australian taxpayers; the onus is on him to now provide some further details," Shadow Communications Minister Nick Minchin said.

Minchin questioned whether the company had a constitution and whether any directors had been named. "ASIC does not appear to have a record of a company by the name the minister mentioned, so at this stage perhaps it is just a number, a broadband company with no name," he added.

Shadow Communications
Minister Nick Minchin

(Credit: AUSPIC)

It is possible the company could have been registered using a temporary name that did not include any reference to "broadband", "NBN" or any other search terms, as it has not yet been formally named. It could have also simply been registered with a number.

"Matters such as the appointment of company board and executive, as well as the formal naming of the company will be considered in the coming weeks and months," Conroy's spokesperson said.

The news comes as Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was in Tasmania this week, to discuss among other things the imminent roll-out of the NBN in the state with Premier David Bartlett. The state and Rudd's government are locked in negotiations regarding the implementation. However, speaking with journalists, Rudd did not provide any concrete details about the government's NBN plans in Tasmania.

"I cannot give you the month nor the day," he said. "But it will be in the second half of the year."

Topics: NBN, Broadband, Government AU

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Talkback

7 comments
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  • bob

    Well the name doesnt turn up on the publicly available ASIC search, so sounds like bullshit to me :P
    anonymous
  • look again

    look again bob and you'll find it somewhere between bullshit and opel.
    anonymous
  • Best you can come up with?

    Must be a slow news day!
    anonymous
  • Top prize for investigative reporting

    So..... I clicked through on this story for you to tell me..... nothing? Why bother reporting what you DON'T know?
    anonymous
  • Vaporware

    Yeah, I tried writing to Conroy to ask for teh details so I could apply for any work there. Nothing, Nicht, Nada, Zilch - Vaporware by the looks
    anonymous
  • @vaporware

    perhaps conroy is busy trying to do stuff for all of us? but he should have dropped everything just for you snookems, cause your special.
    anonymous
  • The world isn't going to end...

    Oh no. Maybe the NBN is being built by a secret underground criminal organisation! Or perhaps you should just get over it. With such close ties to the government (you know, that part where they created and own it), it's perfectly understandable not all the typical events associated with the formation of a privatised corporation would be immediately evident. We like our government to be open with us, but i'm not too upset if everything isn't instantly forthcoming if it's going to mean things are done faster. People complain about bureaucratic nonsense, and then when some bureaucratic process isn't followed, everybody kicks up a stink. Find something better to do with your time.
    anonymous