New tablets from Motion Computing

New tablets from Motion Computing

Summary: Tablet computers are getting plenty of exposure at the moment thanks to Apple and its consumer plaything, the iPad. At the other end of the tablet market is Motion Computing, which since 2001 has quietly built a successful business targeting traditional vertical markets like healthcare, construction and field service workers.

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Tablet computers are getting plenty of exposure at the moment thanks to Apple and its consumer plaything, the iPad. At the other end of the tablet market is Motion Computing, which since 2001 has quietly built a successful business targeting traditional vertical markets like healthcare, construction and field service workers.

Here are some rather fine examples of company product-usage photography to emphasise the point:

Motion Computing has unveiled two upgraded semi-rugged slate tablets, the C5v and F5v. The naming is admirably logical: 'C' stands for 'Clinical' (as in Mobile Clinical Assistant) and 'F' stands for 'Field', while the addition of 'v' to the product name signifies that the new models use Intel's latest Core i5 and i7 processors with vPro security and management technology.

The 10.4in. 'white coat' C5v and 'hard hat' F5v both weigh 1.5kg, and have near-identical specs: 1.2GHz Core i7 or 1.06GHz Core i5 processor, up to 4GB of RAM, integrated Intel HD Graphics, shock-mounted 1.8in. 160GB hard disk (or optional 64GB SSD), 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, optional mobile broadband/GPS (Gobi 2000) and a fingerprint reader. Other options include a 3-megapixel rear camera, a front-facing 1.3-megapixel camera, an RFID reader, a smartcard reader and a barcode scanner. The standard OS is Windows 7 Professional (32-bit), with a downgrade option to Windows XP Tablet PC Edition.

The 40Whr battery delivers 'greater than 4 hours' life, according to Motion Computing and supports hot-swapping — you can charge a second battery in the (optional) desktop docking station.

The LED-backlit display uses extra-strength Gorilla Glass and Hydis AFFS technology for improved (180-degree) viewing angles. There's also a View Anywhere coating to reduce reflectance, making the display more visible in challenging conditions (i.e. outdoors, or under bright lights).

The main difference between the C5v and F5v, apart from the livery, is the presence of a USB 2.0 port on the F5v.

A wide range of peripherals is available to maximise the utility of these tablets. These include a desktop docking station, a mobile dock, an external battery charger, a port replicator (1 x USB 2.0, 1 x Ethernet 10/100) and a clip-on carrying strap.

The C5v and F5v both start at £1,545 (ex. VAT), although be aware that adding peripherals can push the price up quite steeply.

Topic: Reviews

About

Charles has been in tech publishing since the late 1980s, starting with Reed's Practical Computing, then moving to Ziff-Davis to help launch the UK version of PC Magazine in 1992. ZDNet came looking for a Reviews Editor in 2000, and he's been here ever since.

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  • Do these new tablets have a true touchscreen that can be used without the stylus? We deployed a handful of the F5 model and the main complaint is that the user MUST use the stylus on the touchscreen. If they have to type in, it is very slow to use the software keyboard. I should also mention that I would advise getting Windows 7 if it is available. We got them with Vista and they are horribly slow to boot up or shut down. We also had most of the pens go bad (I don't know exactly how but we were only able to use the "eraser" side of the pens). And if they are out of warranty, the pens are quite expensive.
    Chris_Clay
  • It's still a stylus-only screen, and yes Windows 7 is available. Look out for a full review in the coming weeks.
    Charles McLellan