DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

Summary: In a move the tech sector will surely see as a victory, a controversial antipiracy bill in being debated in Congress will no longer seek to require ISPs to block access to overseas Web sites accused of piracy.

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In a move the technology sector will surely see as a victory, a controversial antipiracy bill being debated in Congress will no longer include a provision that would require ISPs to block access to overseas Web sites accused of piracy.

Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas), one of the biggest backers of the Stop Online Piracy Act, today said he plans to remove the Domain Name System (DNS) blocking provision.

"After consultation with industry groups across the country," Smith said in a statement released by his office. "I feel we should remove (DNS) blocking from the Stop Online Piracy Act so that the [U.S. House Judiciary] Committee can further examine the issues surrounding this provision.

"We will continue to look for ways," Smith continued, "to ensure that foreign Web sites cannot sell and distribute illegal content to U.S. consumers."

A watered down SOPA means Smith improves his chances of getting the bill through Congress. Smith's move comes a day after a backers of a similar bill in the Senate, known as the Protect IP Act, began to backtrack on the issue of DNS.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, the sponsor of Pro IP, a bill heavily supported by the music and film industries, said he would yank the DNS sections that mandate DNS blocking and redirecting.

The technology sector was nearly unanimously against the bill and labored to rally opposition. The few tech companies that did support the bill, such as GoDaddy, felt a harsh backlash from customer-companies.

For more of this story, read DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents on CNET News.

Topics: Piracy, Browser, Enterprise Software, Networking, Security

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  • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

    "We will continue to look for ways," Smith continued, "to ensure that foreign Web sites cannot sell and distribute illegal content to U.S. consumers."<br><br>Does that mean it will still be OK for U.S. Websites to sell illegal content to U.S. consumers? I guess the U.S. governement doesn't want to stifle the U.S. priacy market.
    anothercanuck
    • As always, the US govt is full of it

      @anothercanuck Democrat or Republican. The US govt is nothing but a bunch of lying politicians, totally indebted to their special interests.
      otaddy
    • Oh well

      I guess @anothercanuck will have to lobby the halls of Congress and try to get it back.

      Don't forget to bring a big bag of money with you. ;)
      ScorpioBlue
  • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

    I don't condemn piracy, but I'd love to do business outside of the US. That is, if I need to buy something that's not available in the US. I once bought a $20 flashlight for my bike outside the US in the Internet. It's very bright; it powers up to 900 lumens.
    Grayson Peddie
    • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

      @Grayson Peddie

      As foreign countries are not subject to US regulations, sometimes you can get some really interesting and potentially dangerous stuff outside the USA. Regulations are good, but they also filter out things too that shouldn't be.
      DonRupertBitByte
  • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

    Its called the WORLD WIDE web for a reason. Do we want the US to be like China? We say we believe in Freedom but things like SOPA wish to tarnish our beloved word.
    mikegonzalez2k
  • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

    Do not be fooled this is a trick they do all the time. They introduce legislation with one or two onerous provisions that get everyone into an uproar. Then they remove the provisions everyone get happy and looks the other way while the majority of the legislation still passes. Then later they try to push the onerous provisions through linked to some major defense bill or such. Please do not fall for this feint.
    alricsca
    • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

      @alricsca

      Good point. Which is why the SOPA fight isn't over with. The EFF and it's allies should not be resting on their laurels.
      ScorpioBlue
  • RE: DNS provision pulled from SOPA, victory for opponents

    Ok, so they pulled the DNS measures from SOPA... what about Protect-IP??!!

    Were we just sold a bait-n-switch? 'now that this crisis has been averted', will the public revert back to Tebowism and allow Protect-IP to pass as it's written?
    UrNotPayingAttention
  • SOPA might be diluted, but.......

    They way I understand SOPA, there is a provision that allows the big companies to ask for censor of small web business as easy as a government agency. If this one provision is true, this bothers me the most. Large companies have legal departments driven by marketing. They will do everything they can to slow up - stop a small guy from offering competition. Please advise if this isn't a provision of SOPA
    kkbbllaacckk