Nokia Lumia 900 Tango update now available, press conference with Microsoft on 5 September

Nokia Lumia 900 Tango update now available, press conference with Microsoft on 5 September

Summary: Nokia continues to actively support the Lumia 900 and you can now connect to your Windows or Mac computer and get your device updated. Microsoft and Nokia are also holding a press conference in a few weeks.

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Nokia Lumia 900 Tango update now available, press conference with Microsoft on 5 September

I read about the Nokia Lumia 900 Tango update and immediately connected my 900 to my PC to get the process started. It took three updates and about 45 minutes to complete the backup and upgrade process, but I can already tell that my Lumia 900 is an improved device. The folks at WPCentral updated a couple of days ago and posted some initial impressions as well as some thoughts on the improved camera. In related Nokia news, we also learned that Nokia and Microsoft will be holding a press event in New York city on 5 September.

The Tango update (should bring you to OS version 7.10.8779.8) provides the following for US customers:

  • Camera performance improvements
  • Flip to silence feature: Don't look anywhere for a setting since it is on by default. HTC has always had this and more slick phone utilities that I wish Microsoft would adopt for all WP devices.
  • Screen brightness performance improvement
  • Improved proximity sensor
  • Multiple photos and voice notes in MMS
  • Battery performance improvements
  • Capacitive buttons that stay lit as long as the display is on

Flip to silence is great as long as it performs reliably. I am pleased by the camera improvements and look forward to testing it out soon. It's always great to see quick updates from vendors and unlike HTC, Nokia looks to be doing it right here with Windows Phone.

This update also brings the following updates to Canadian Lumia 900 owners:

  • Flip-to-silence feature
  • Support for Contacts Share app, to send and receive business cards as text messages
  • Proximity sensor performance enhancements
  • Removes purple hue which affected some phones in low-light conditions (this was fixed previously for US owners)
  • Startup sequence performance enhancements
  • Camera performance enhancements

Speculation regarding the 5 September press event, I haven't received an invite yet, is that Nokia will show off Windows Phone 8 device plans and maybe even reveal some launch details. In the past Nokia wasn't known for quick launches, but under Stephen Elop they actually were quick to get devices out to consumers so we can only hope for the best. We may also see some Windows Phone 8 details without any hardware announcement and just a Windows Phone 7.8 release. I am still excited about this since I find my Lumia 900 to be a great device and the improved Start screen would be a great addition.

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Topics: Mobility, Microsoft, Nokia

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17 comments
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  • Tango has been available for a while now ...

    Matt

    How does Nokia receive praise here over HTC? Updates come from Microsoft. OEMs don't need to do much of anything for devices to receive them other than test the updates. It's the carriers who are the problem. Tango has been available for a long time now. The unlocked HTC Mozart got this update back in May. Seriously, with Microsoft obviously willing to update the OS in an almost Windows Desktop way, why are carriers even involved in having to REQUEST the update IF they want to update carrier branded devices on their networks? I will be interested to see how this works out for Windows Phone 8 and the enthusiasts who are hoping for no carrier interference with updates. Until that issue is cleared up, Apple will have a following of those who seek parity in their devices with like devices from the same OS developer regardless of carrier. What about those early-adopting Windows Phone 7 users whose devices can handle the Tango update? Will they continue to receive support? The smartphone market has reached a saturation point mostly because even upgrading is costly. The well is drying up and there are fewer bodies needing smartphones. Demand will plateau. The OS developer that delivers value to its installed base will profit the most over the long term. That means supporting existing devices in a timely fashion. When an update is announced, it shouldn't take months on end for it to be available to users. The carriers need to be put in their places as dumb pipes. Their apps suck and no one wants their credit card information going through the ISIS payment systems nor do I want to pay for media services that are limited by data caps.
    theNewDanger
  • Tango has been available for a while now ...

    Matt

    How does Nokia receive praise here over HTC? Updates come from Microsoft. OEMs don't need to do much of anything for devices to receive them other than test the updates. It's the carriers who are the problem. Tango has been available for a long time now. The unlocked HTC Mozart got this update back in May. Seriously, with Microsoft obviously willing to update the OS in an almost Windows Desktop way, why are carriers even involved in having to REQUEST the update IF they want to update carrier branded devices on their networks? I will be interested to see how this works out for Windows Phone 8 and the enthusiasts who are hoping for no carrier interference with updates. Until that issue is cleared up, Apple will have a following of those who seek parity in their devices with like devices from the same OS developer regardless of carrier. What about those early-adopting Windows Phone 7 users whose devices can handle the Tango update? Will they continue to receive support? The smartphone market has reached a saturation point mostly because even upgrading is costly. The well is drying up and there are fewer bodies needing smartphones. Demand will plateau. The OS developer that delivers value to its installed base will profit the most over the long term. That means supporting existing devices in a timely fashion. When an update is announced, it shouldn't take months on end for it to be available to users. The carriers need to be put in their places as dumb pipes. Their apps suck and no one wants their credit card information going through the ISIS payment systems nor do I want to pay for media services that are limited by data caps.
    theNewDanger
    • Holy double post Batman!

      With that said, I agree with all of the above^^^

      ...and I can't wait to get my hands on a Windows 8 Phone, so I can drop this iPhone like a hot potato!
      Intrepolicious
    • OMG

      don't post if you don't know stuff. the article is about a recent firmware upgrade by nokia.
      it was made by nokia and handed off to Microsoft to add as an update. there are two types of updates. firmware and OS..
      B_Manx
  • Anybody Else Read Tomi Ahonen?

    This guy is a long-time mobile-phone expert, and his blog has the most detailed list of all the things wrong with Windows Phone and the Nokia Lumia that you will find anywhere--published long before it became clear to everyone what a dog they are.

    Why are salespeople so reluctant to sell Windows phones? Apparently it's because they have a 40% return rate. So if you care about keeping your commission, you're going to recommend a phone that the customer is more likely to be satisfied with. Simple economics.
    ldo17
    • Follow him with spoon-size pinch of salt.

      Mr. Ahonen has indeed been strongly after the Lumia line return rates. I have not heard (or read) him using exact percentage so far, but for 40% I can say for sure the number is totally made up.
      Why? Because no company on this planet will sell a product that has 40% return rates, unless the remaining 60% carry profit of 66,7% of the sales price (to cover the costs of returned products). We can be sure that the Lumia phones do not, judging from aggressive pricing.
      The return rate issue as a whole is rather interesting. Mr. Ahonen continuously refers to it, but if you backtrack the links he provides for the subject, his "source of reference" is his own blog post containing one sentence about it: "Lumia is being returned at catastrophic levels, such as we hear from Russia right now"
      No there his "hear from Russia" refers to blog of Eldar Murtazin, another Nokia antagonist. Original post of Eldar was made on March 30th, only in Russian. Tomi posted his statement on April 11th. Murtazin blog finally got English translation on May 15th, over a month after Ahonen's claim.
      But the key thing is - There is not a single word on Lumia in the blog of Eldar Murtazin.
      Tomi Ahonen has a long track record of making up facts and twisting numbers. Perhaps the best coverage is this:
      http://dominiescommunicate.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/incredible-liar-or-incredibly-incompetent/
      ExNokian
      • Re: Because no company on this planet will sell a product that has 40% ...

        If you can call Lumia phones "selling", when they seem to be undergoing price cut after price cut.

        All in all, the figures do seem consistent with Mr Ahonen's claims.
        ldo17
        • Re: price cut after price cut

          The media attention Lumia and Nokia are getting nowadays is really funny, but in a sad way. Unsubsidized unlocked price of Lumia 900 was $575 and has decreased to $500 (Amazon). So it's effectively a 13% price cut. Much less than what Nokia has dropped from price of e.g. MeeGo phone N9 or what we have seen with Symbian phones in the past.
          But news (And anything you'll hear from Mr. Ahonen) are made about AT&T subsidized price dropping from $49 to $0.01 (Amazon), indicating a price cut of 99.98%. I have no clue if anyone anywhere actually buys such a bogus, but this is what we hear.

          And may I ask what figures seem consistent to Mr. Ahonen's claims? Subscriber count of Nokia's "Nokia Money" service? Ahonen stick with 1.2 million whereas reality is 100 000 to 200 000.
          ExNokian
          • Thing is...

            ... the MSRP doesn't matter at all, at least in the USA and other parts of the world where nearly all phones are subsidized by the telcos. The MSRP is simply a made-up number that can be related back to the actual price the telcos pay in bulk.

            The real news is that, while the MSRP was set at the level of a flagship device, more or less (Apple iPhone 4S, Google Galaxy Nexus, Motorola RAZR, Samsung Galaxy S3, etc), the initial selling price was $100. And just about immediately marked down to $50. At the moment, the subsidized price on Amazon is $19. The prices have been reflective of experimentation, sure (particularly on Amazon), but by now, they've essentially settled to the point where some of these sell. And they're still not selling all that well. And you can find contract-free versions for $350 or so, even if the official price from Nokia is still just over $500.

            But even that's high. The vastly superior Google Galaxy Nexus is now being sold directly (for GSM) from Google Play for $350. The Lumia 900 just doesn't make it as a 2012 smartphone -- it's more typical of what everyone else sold in 2010. And that's not really Nokia's fault, Microsoft simply didn't allow for a modern screen resolution, and the WinCE kernel doesn't support multiprocessing, so they were stuck on a single processor.

            And sure, that wasn't a problem, also due to WinCE, which was put on phones back in the days of 100MHz processors. But this also limits the scope of applications these phones will run. Microsoft's cutting them off with Win7Phone, rather than allowing an upgrade, is admission they simply can't run the current OS (curiously, Google has already put the latest version of Android on their two year old phone, and it works quite well). This is also not Nokia's fault.

            But what is Nokia's fault was throwing the whole company onto Windows Phone, killing (effectively) their SymbianOS and Linux platforms, a whole year before Windows Phones existed. That's such a classic blunder, it's going to be taught in business schools for decades, even if Nokia does recover (which is not at all assured... they have enough cash to last the year, but not through 2013 at the current rates, even after the last layoff of 10,000 employees).
            Hazydave
      • Well except Microsoft

        And apparently Nokia. The X-box 360 had a 60% return rate when it launched, I've heard it is now down to 12%. The Lumia 900 had so many problems that half of them were returned, I returned mine, an got an iPhone 4s. The Lumia 900 was such a piece of crap, I literally wanted to throw that cheap piece of crap out a car window, several times.
        Troll Hunter J
  • Sad thing is update process...

    I am glad that Nokia Lumia 7.x phones are getting an update (likely their last ?), but the fact that they have to plug the phone into a PC or Mac to get the update is kind of sad. Over the Air updates should have been achievable (unless possibly you want to require people to continue purchasing PCs ?). This means that in developing countries, where not everyone has a PC (or in developed countries where not everyone wants to buy a PC or Mac) you limit your customer base, or they have to take the phone in to get an update.
    I think Mr. Ahonen has more right in his articles than he has wrong so I will take his comments with a TableSpoon or at least a Teaspoon of salt (actually it was what many Nokia fans including myself said... that Nokia going all-in on Windows Phone was, at best, premature).
    jkohut
    • Re: cabling phone to PC / Mac

      As part of the update process, Zune / the Mac connector takes a backup of the phone to quickly and easily roll back, should the OEM (or more likely, the carrier) botch their tweaks to the OS update. Backing up several Gigs worth of device specific config OTA would potentially cost the end user a fortune. Not to mention potential problems in pulling the backup from storage direct to the handset if the device is FUBAR. And finally, would you trust your carrier to keep your backup safe and secure?
      mountjl
  • We are legion and we will prevail

    So M$ its givin all his might to save some face with Nokia.... what you do when you are desperate and frustrated youll cry and shout with all your strengt, after all the other OS including RIM dying brand wont let the WP to even stay a couple of year as a product for the masses. Im not saying this as a M$ hater is just the simple truth. Corporations like microsoft who have that awful product shove in our minds are likely to dissapear cause the evolution of technology points to something that in real life was a scam but technology and the will of the people will bring to reality. Technological Comunism! yes read it. Technology like knowledge belongs to the wellbeing of humankind and every day people provide better solutions with opensource software. But enough about dreams..who cares about a phone that it is inferior to other phones like android...?
    realvarezm
  • Nokia Lumia 900

    Nokia Lumia 900 comes as one of the first Windows Phone smart phones to support LTE connectivity. It also features a 4.3" WVGA AMOLED display with Clear Black technology, polycarbonate uni body in different colors, 1.4GHz CPU, 16GB of internal memory and 1830mAh battery. It has an 8MP camera, aided by the Carl Zeiss optics with f2.2/28mm lens, and features a tech called "double wide mode", for extra scene width going into your frame. The phone weighs 5.6 ounces (160g) and is 127.8 x 68.5 x 11.5 mm in dimensions.
    alextyler
    • You know what "polycarbonate uni body" means, right?

      It means nokia is trying to cash in on Apple's use of a unibody design for their Macbook computers. The cheap plastic bodies will get shiny spots within the fist year. While the plastic is in fact colored, rather than just painted, it still scratches easily, and once dirt gets into those scratches the phone look like trash.
      Troll Hunter J
  • apple who?

    quad core and 2 gigs of ram who needs and peace of fruit in thier pocket.
    sarai1313@...
    • So you don't want a Windows Mango phone then?

      Being a Mango is a fruit. But which version do you have 7.1 with Mango updates, or 7.5 with Mango updates?
      Troll Hunter J