OnForce: Most independent IT contractors want to stay independent

OnForce: Most independent IT contractors want to stay independent

Summary: More than half of independent IT workers wouldn’t consider working for someone else even if the salary and benefits were comparable, based on a new survey.

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A new survey from OnForce argues that we are in the midst of a major shift away from requiring in-house IT expertise toward a growing IT contractor workforce.

Now, being that OnForce is a company that focuses on providing other businesses with outsourced but on-site IT talent, it's no surprise that they would promote this trend.

However, the Massachusetts-based business has some big numbers intended to back up these arguments.

After surveying more than 500 IT contractors, OnForce found that not only did 60 percent of them willingly join the independent workforce, but 56 percent of them also wouldn't consider working for someone else even if the salary and benefits were comparable.

zdnet-onforce-it-employment

Thus, thanks to this rising trend, many IT workers have been able to avoid a lot of the pitfalls and risks of unemployment seen in other industries under the current economic climate.

Researchers found that unemployment for tech professionals dropped to a "staggeringly low" 3.3 percent during the third quarter of 2012.

OnForce concluded that, at this point, companies looking to hire in-house specialized talent are finding the search to be long and difficult -- and the traditional hiring process doesn’t meet the growing need to turn around tech projects quickly.

Thus, OnForce recommended that contractors allow companies fill immediate IT needs without having to settle for lesser talent, which would otherwise put them "behind the eight-ball for innovation."

Infographic via OnForce

Topics: IT Priorities, IT Employment, Tech Industry

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4 comments
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  • OnForce Is both right and wrong. But contracting is future of IT.

    The opportunities I have been exposed to over the last 2.5 years of being an OnForce technician have been extraordinary to say the least. (and to a somewhat lesser extent, Work Market) With the sheer variety of assignments and never going too the same place twice (unless you choose the next assignment at that same location) is great and is a great way of keeping yourself well rounded and current.

    The experience has not been perfect, but the pro's outweigh the con's by a factor of five IMHO. the big plus is that I have current and very relevant experience in many areas of the I.T. Industry, some examples are CCTV both IP and analogue, fiber optics, cat5 and 6, operating systems, point of sale, WiFi, T1 installation, DSL and Cable Modems and heck even the latest and greatest high volume postage metering devices.

    The biggest drawback is like all business owner and independent contractors, you must also take on non I.T. roles such as accountant and public relations manger to really succeed.

    My take on this is, as a 2.5 year OnForce veteran:

    Independent contracting your I.T. Talents is for you IF: You are and adventurous person who has endless ambition, excellent communication skills, a decent grasp on accounting and taxes (IE: keep all receipts for everything you do, learn what can be written off), and loves to work very hard but needs to have full control of your schedule.

    However if you are someone that enjoys the routine of working Monday throught Friday 9 to 5 and having two weeks on paid vacation each year, likes getting a refund from the IRS each year on withheld taxes, getting to know and befriend co-workers and having some one "TELL YOU EXACTLY WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT" every single day and not use you mind to creatively solve problems (Me = Huge MacGuyver fan) then don't try this except as a temporary income stream during times of unemployment.

    I am a big fan of OnForce, it has completely and irreversibly changed my life, I will never go back to the time clock again in my lifetime, EVER.

    If you have not gussed by now, my answer to the survey would have been no, not at the same income level.

    NOTE TO STUDENTS WHO ARE PREPAREING FOR A CAREER IN I.T.

    Get a minor in business management or public relations, the extra skills will prove to be invaluable if you wind up going "independent".
    compugeek2001@...
  • OnForce Is both right and wrong. But contracting is future of IT.

    The opportunities I have been exposed to over the last 2.5 years of being an OnForce technician have been extraordinary to say the least. (and to a somewhat lesser extent, Work Market) With the sheer variety of assignments and never going too the same place twice (unless you choose the next assignment at that same location) is great and is a great way of keeping yourself well rounded and current.

    The experience has not been perfect, but the pro's outweigh the con's by a factor of five IMHO. the big plus is that I have current and very relevant experience in many areas of the I.T. Industry, some examples are CCTV both IP and analogue, fiber optics, cat5 and 6, operating systems, point of sale, WiFi, T1 installation, DSL and Cable Modems and heck even the latest and greatest high volume postage metering devices.

    The biggest drawback is like all business owner and independent contractors, you must also take on non I.T. roles such as accountant and public relations manger to really succeed.

    My take on this is, as a 2.5 year OnForce veteran:

    Independent contracting your I.T. Talents is for you IF: You are and adventurous person who has endless ambition, excellent communication skills, a decent grasp on accounting and taxes (IE: keep all receipts for everything you do, learn what can be written off), and loves to work very hard but needs to have full control of your schedule.

    However if you are someone that enjoys the routine of working Monday throught Friday 9 to 5 and having two weeks on paid vacation each year, likes getting a refund from the IRS each year on withheld taxes, getting to know and befriend co-workers and having some one "TELL YOU EXACTLY WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT" every single day and not use you mind to creatively solve problems (Me = Huge MacGuyver fan) then don't try this except as a temporary income stream during times of unemployment.

    I am a big fan of OnForce, it has completely and irreversibly changed my life, I will never go back to the time clock again in my lifetime, EVER.

    If you have not gussed by now, my answer to the survey would have been no, not at the same income level.

    NOTE TO STUDENTS WHO ARE PREPAREING FOR A CAREER IN I.T.

    Get a minor in business management or public relations, the extra skills will prove to be invaluable if you wind up going "independent".
    compugeek2001@...
  • I am in the 17%.

    As I have a family to take care of, I have no desire to do contract IT work. I am only doing so because there isn't anything else in my area right now. I don't believe the survey respondents at all.
    jbach67
  • Abias company

    I have been with onforce scent sept 2009. I have seen a lot of changes in the management department. My states on the onforce platform is above average. Just recently I had aproblem with onforce giving aSLI and take the SLI away and all the information, Toby Medcaf at onforce said use the forums, this time I did and now they suspended my account. This is on onforce deal with their problems now. they are like children, they don't face them. They attempt to cover them up and hide them. To me it is a sad story for company that started out so good to start acting out in this way. Also their respond to my post is communication is imposable to post problems. they cut off sending work order to me, is this how a company suppose to act. These action cause me to have flashback about my children when they where 5 years old. Make up stories to get out of the trouble.So onforce shows me now if a person points out their problem, they block that person.
    Steve Bristow