OS X 10.8.1 update fixes issues with Exchange, Active Directory, SMB

OS X 10.8.1 update fixes issues with Exchange, Active Directory, SMB

Summary: Apple released its first update to OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.1) today improving issues with Exchange server, Thunderbolt displays and iMessages amongst others.

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OS X 10.8.1 update released - Jason O'Grady

Apple today released OS X 10.8.1 Mountain Lion via the new Software Update mechanism that's built into the Mac App Store. Users with Mountain Lion installed will see the update while running Software Update from System Preferences or by clicking on the Updates tab at the top of the Mac App Store.

The associated knowledgebase article states that the new code includes general operating system fixes that improve stability and compatibility, including the following fixes:

  • Resolve an issue that may cause Migration Assistant to unexpectedly quit
  • Improve compatibility when connecting to a Microsoft Exchange server in Mail
  • Address an issue playing audio through a Thunderbolt display
  • Resolve an issue that could prevent iMessages from being sent
  • Address an issue that could cause the system to become unresponsive when using Pinyin input
  • Resolve an issue when connecting to SMB servers with long names
  • Address a issue that may prevent Safari from launching when using a Proxy Automatic Configuration (PAC) file
  • Improve 802.1X authentication with Active Directory credentials

Miraculously, the delta update weighs only 7.28MB on my MacBook Air 13-inch and standalone updater is only 24.2MB indicating that Apple has vastly streamlined the updated process in Mountain Lion (Lion combo updated weighed in at as much as 500MB).

There's no word (yet) on if the 10.8.1 update improves the battery life issues experienced by many MacBook users running Mountain Lion.

 

Topics: Apple, Operating Systems, Software

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15 comments
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  • Just updated

    On my first machine, running on the second.
    sjaak327
  • Cool

    If battery life gets back to SL-levels, my early-2011 MBP will be upgraded to 10.8.1 in a jiffy. If not, SL will remain until Apple properly fixes it. :) 10.7 was a joke for the MacBooks in terms of battery life... :(
    HypnoToad72
    • Maybe on your MBP...

      ... my wife's Early 2008 MBP went from around 3.5 hours max to around 4.5 hours max on the minimum display brightness with a move from Snow Kitteh to Lion, with a battery that only holds about 80% capacity.
      Champ_Kind
  • Already?

    Jeez. That was fast... I guess 10.8.2 will be out in September. :-)
    Gisabun
    • Hopefully...

      hopefully it will. 10.8.2 already exists in test builds for developers.

      There is nothing wrong with quick updates.
      doh123
      • That didn't appear to be the case when it came to Microsoft.

        Sorry, had to say it.
        ye
        • ZOMG ABM TROLL ALERT!!!!!

          HOW DARE YOU VILIFY THE BORG!
          Champ_Kind
        • Are you refering to MS and quickly updating?

          If so, the reason that MS updates are an unwelcome pain in the rear is that they take very long to download and install. I have had .NET 2x, 3x and 4x updates hit at the same time and the computer was useless for over 35 minutes. It was impossible to do any work while the system strained to update itself.

          When finally done, I got to sit through yet another reboot, log on, and initialization of services, network and oh yes, the antivirus engine which takes way to long. Also, the AV code will invariably look and usually find a signature update to download and apply while the machine struggles to re-initialize. After about 45+ minutes, I have the pleasure of finding all of the applications that I was using and reloading all the work files I was trying to use.

          On my MBP, the updates load mostly transparently, rarely require a reboot and basically have no impact on my productivity. They are also usually smaller than Windows OS and .NET service updates.

          I no longer allow Windows to update itself (after several issues, I just stopped letting Windows try to manage itself) and my Windows machines are asleep except when I need to use a specialized Windows application. This keeps there cross section to malicious attacks minimal because if the OS is not active, it can't be compromised.

          So I am notified about the updates only come when I am trying to work. Of course, I stop work and spend my time waiting because I certainly want all of the newly revealed vulnerabilities to be patched as soon as possible.

          If it wasn't for the slow and bothersome tasks of updating Windows constantly, I would have a much better opinion about Windows in general. For now, Windows management is a necessary burdened and not a choice.
          Splork
          • You obviously never updated point releases

            From Apple, they are sometimes over one gigabyte. This particular update, whilst small required a reboot as wel, so not sure why Apple gets a free pass and Microsoft isn't. Bias no doubt is playing a role here.

            Of course if you did use common sense, you would realise how splendid MS uldate cycle is, it is called patch tuesday and happens every second tuesday of the month, so that admins and users alike can plan for it (I know in your case this is a novel concept), so that it does not influence their workflow. In fact, the update mechanism lets you set all kinds of parameters (that are totally absent in Osx update system). Maybe one day you might figure them out and understand why Microsoft is years ahead in the parch department on Apple. And not only because MS DOES provide timely and accurate patches, something that over the years seems like a mission impossible on Apple's part.
            sjaak327
          • Nothing wrong with a reboot

            I did it with Windows, and now I'l do it with OS X. I actually find myself doing it more often with OS X, but that's because I use the point release betas as well.
            Michael Alan Goff
          • And, you obviously never learned how to use spell check...

            ...Despite spell checkers coming with every single browser since like Firefox 2.0. I don't understand how you can ignore all those red squiggly lines without doing something about them.

            If you actually did use spell check, I might believe that you actually know how to use a computer properly- whether in Windows or Mac OSX- and I might have a little more respect for your opinion.

            Just saying.... (P.S.- I had three typos while making this post, and Mac OSX actually AUTO-CORRECTED them for me, so I didn't even have to run spell check or see the red squiggly lines as I typed).
            Noah Frost
          • The spell check

            Has been disabled on the ipad I typed the message on, as it is really bad. Maybe next time you could stick to the message instead of the language usage ?

            By the way, would I have used the ipad's auto-correct function, the number of errors would have been huge.

            In any case the errors are due to the touch keyboard, which again could have been better, unfortunately I don't have an external keyboard I can hook onto the ipad, as that would obviously have helped here, and would have protected me from people that whinge about a few typing errors, whilst completely ignoring the topic, which of course is highly off-topic and does not add anything to the discussion, way to go !
            sjaak327
          • Maybe we should harp on his inability

            to fly a jet fighter, seeing as he prefers to critisizze rather then to add something usefull.

            I have to agree that the MS upgrade sycle id far moe robust in it's managemennt then that of Apple, but then you have to look at the end users for that:

            MS caters to the enterprise, while Apple has mostly concentrated on the consumer end, where updates are not as misssion criticall.
            John Zern
    • I'd expect it to launch

      On, shortly after, or shortly before iOS 6.

      So, yeah, September.

      Updates are going to likely come quicker when their OS update schedule is monthly.
      Michael Alan Goff
      • Errr... wha?

        I meant yearly XD

        I miss edit. D:
        Michael Alan Goff