Overheating iPad claim put to the test

Overheating iPad claim put to the test

Summary: The new iPad runs about seven degrees warmer than its predecessor under heavy use, tests have shown.According to tests performed by the US Consumer Reports site, a resource-intensive game such as Infinity Blade II can see the new iPad get as warm as 47 degrees Celsius (116 degrees Fahrenheit) when plugged in.

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TOPICS: Telcos
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The new iPad runs about seven degrees warmer than its predecessor under heavy use, tests have shown.

According to tests performed by the US Consumer Reports site, a resource-intensive game such as Infinity Blade II can see the new iPad get as warm as 47 degrees Celsius (116 degrees Fahrenheit) when plugged in. The same test carried out on the iPad 2 hit 40 degrees Celsius.

Similarly, when unplugged, the new iPad ran up to 45 degrees Celsius while the iPad 2 hit a maximum of seven degrees less. These figures back up anecdotal reports that have said the newer tablet is noticeably warmer in operation than its predecessor.

However, tests carried out by ZDNet UK sister site CNET News.com using a different methodology achieved less toasty results, with a maximum temperature of 34 degrees Celsius. The Dutch site Tweakers.net came to the same conclusion, noting that this was still more than five degrees hotter than the iPad 2 got.

The biggest differences between the two models are graphics-related — the new iPad has a much higher resolution, which is powered by a more powerful graphics chip that in turn requires a battery with a capacity around 70 percent larger than its predecessor, in order to achieve comparable longevity.

Apple said the new iPad operates "well within [its] thermal specifications", and customers with any concerns can "contact AppleCare".

Topic: Telcos

David Meyer

About David Meyer

David Meyer is a freelance technology journalist. He fell into journalism when he realised his musical career wouldn't pay the bills. David's main focus is on communications, as well as internet technologies, regulation and mobile devices.

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3 comments
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  • Maybe we will see a Hot Water Bottle app!
    anonymous
  • So in other words CNET and tweakers.net tested it while reading an ebook or something that didnt put the device through its paces? If you're looking to see how hot something gets, you run it the hardest, not run an app that will ruin any credibility people think you might have. How embarrassing and pathetic to even report it 13 degrees lower than someone else.
    ncc1664
  • @ncc1664 Either you're a troll, or you didn't bother to read the cnet article. If you're not a troll (which I doubt), you may want to have a quick look at it, and perhaps reconsider your post.
    richard@...