Phone sex: Using our smartphones from the shower to the sack

Phone sex: Using our smartphones from the shower to the sack

Summary: We are so unwilling to part with our smartphone that we use it everywhere. In church, the shower, on a date and even during sex according to a study released today.

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The mobile consumer habits study released today shows smartphone usage is extremely prevalent in Americans’ everyday lives. Nearly one in ten smartphone owners admit to having used their phone during sex, in the shower, in church or other place of worship and more.

Where we use our smartphones
Credit: Jumio

The study has been released by Jumio, a credentials management company headquartered in Palo Alto CA. It offers payments, ID scanning and validation products for mobile and web transactions designed to reduce fraud in customer transactions.

It was founded in 2010 by CEO Daniel Mattes and is backed by investors including Andreessen Horowitz, Citi Ventures and Facebook co-founder, Eduardo Saverin.

“People view their smartphones as an extension of themselves, taking them everywhere they go –  from the shower to their commute, from the dinner table to the bedroom,”  -- Marc Barach, chief marketing and strategy officer, Jumio.

The study was conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of Jumio between June 13-17, 2013, amongst 2021 U.S. online adults, of whom 1102 respondents are smartphone owners /users, aged 18 and older.

The 2013 Mobile Consumer Habits study gives insight into the behaviors of Americans and their smartphones, along with their top concerns over losing their beloved device.

We get separation anxiety if we are away from our smartphones.

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of respondents report being within five feet of their smartphones the majority of the time.

Respondents admitted to using their devices in some unusual places. Nowhere seems to be off limits, with some adults using their smartphones:

  • In a movie theater – 35%
  • During a dinner date – 33%
  • At a child’s or school function – 32%
  • In church or a place of worship – 19%
  • While in the shower - 12%

We are so addicted that despite warnings and, laws in most states about the dangers of talking or texting while driving, more than one-half (55%) of users admit to using their smartphone whilst driving their cars.

Our bad habits extend much further than just using the phone when we drive. Now “sexting” takes on a whole new meaning, with almost one in 10 (9%) adults admitting they’ve used their phone actually during sex itself.

  • The young are even more daring and comfortable with their smartphones as bedfellows; this number rises to one in five (20%) among those aged 18-34.
  • When even the most intimate of moments is not a cell phone-free zone it still distracts us. 12% of respondents in a relationship said they believe their smart phone gets in the way of that relationship.
What we worry about when we lose our smartphone
Credit: Jumio

 When it comes to their primary concern over losing their smartphone, Americans are most worried about:

  • Theft of personal information – 65%
  • Losing contact with others – 58%
  • Calls being made on their behalf – 39%
  • Someone logging into their social profiles – 33%
  • Someone using their mobile payment options – 26% 

Though it is not often far from our reach we worry about what will happen if we lose our phone.

The majority (59%) of Americans keep their phone password protected. But people still fear what will happen if their phone ends up in someone else’s hands.

Few of us password protect our phones
Credit: Jumio

This may be tied to the fact that nearly three in 10 adults (29%) admit to snooping on someone else’s phone.

Single respondents seem to be more concerned about privacy than their married counterparts and are more likely to password protect their phones than those who are married (69% vs. 55%).

  • Two in five (42%) single smartphone owners admit to snooping on someone else’s phone, whilst only one-quarter (25%) of married people say the same.
  • Younger adults, aged 18-34 (47%), are more likely to snoop than those aged over 35, but some older adults still admit to poking around on someone else’s phone. 
  • In adults aged between 35-44, 29% admit to snooping, 45-54 (21%) and the over 55’s (9%).

“People view their smartphones as an extension of themselves, taking them everywhere they go – even the most unorthodox places – from the shower to their commute, from the dinner table to the bedroom,” said Marc Barach, chief marketing and strategy officer, Jumio.

“And panic sets in when consumers are separated from their devices, with privacy concerns topping the list.

People have good reason to be on high alert; nearly 30 percent of adults admit to snooping on someone else’s mobile phone, making users aware of the potential violations that happen when we put our own phones down.” he said.

This study throws up some interesting data and is very much in line with the FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) culture study findings released earlier this week. Can we actually take a break from our connected lives? Can we bear to be separated from our devices?

And if we do get separated from our phones we worry that our accounts are being compromised – all because we could not be bothered to configure that password on our device.

Topic: Social Enterprise

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8 comments
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  • Stats skewed

    I think the stats are skewed because of the role the smartphone now plays. The survey doesn't say what they were using the phone for.

    1. 55% used whilst driving, but that could be used as a satnav - which historically would have been a separate device.
    2. Using at a school's function is likely to be as a camera
    3. Using during sex - again, more likely a camera than looking up sport scores I'd imagine *ahem* not speaking from experience of course!

    No wonder theft of personal data is the top issue with point 3 in mind ;)
    ebone9999
    • And the church statistic.......

      YouVersion just passed 100,000,000 million downloads! Using the smartphone to access various versions of the Bible during service is much easier to carry, and to read when the lights are low.

      The article "implies" that having a smartphone in church may be a bad thing....NOT!
      linux for me
  • There's an app for that

    The Kama Sutra app is why they made smartphones.
    jvitous
  • Smartphone uses

    Ok, the last first, I don't protect my smartphone with a password because I keep control of my smartphone at all times. The only time it is not on my person is when I am in my house, or my wife is using it. Should it get stolen by force, I can remotely erase it from my wife's phone.
    Now as to where I use it... I do use it when driving, but reluctantly, and usually try to pull over if I need to see the phone to do what is needed. I am able to converse with another person in the car, so I can't see why talking on a phone is that much more distracting. I don't use it any of the other stated places. Maybe it has to do with my age (70), but I consider most of those places phone free zones.
    rphunter1242
  • Clever title to draw readers!!

    .......Now I know why all phones have the vibrate function! ;-)
    **owly**
    • There's literally an app for that ...

      ... and they recommend putting your smartphone in a ziploc bag, first.
      imalugnut
  • Cardiac Patients

    may soon, if not already, keep their smartphones handy to monitor data sent by Bluetooth or other short range wireless from their EKG contacts. That would, of course, include making love to one's intimate partner (remember the cautions in the ED ads?) and showering. What constitutes "using" the phone? Actually handling it, pushing buttons and/or talking? Or just having it nearby performing an automatic vital sign recording function?

    And as for driving, why do police say they WANT drivers to report drunken or careless behavior by other drivers, but they do NOT want anyone to use their phone to make the report?
    jallan32
  • Mayve you do...

    Like 44% of American adults, I don't even own one of the damn things.

    Also, jallan32, here's a novel idea: maybe they'd prer that you note the offender's details and then STOP SOMEPLACE SAFE to make the report!
    Ginevra